Subaru Outback - Subaru Diesels - RaineMan

A young relative proudly showed me his new (for him) 08 Outback yesterday. This had replaced a troublesome 05 diesel Passat. In fact I did not even know he had brought the Passat as he only had it a short time. Going around the car I noticed the words "Boxer Diesel". I am aware that Subarus are noted for reliability and have chain driven engine but are their diesels more reliable than the opposition?

Subaru Outback - Subaru Diesels - Ian D
In a word no, crankshaft bearing failure can be a problem. A colleague of mine at work bought one a year ago, 60000 miles, full Subaru history, £8500 I think he paid but may be wrong, a year later (a few weeks ago, 72000 miles) crankshaft bearing failure, car grinds to a rattly halt. Replacement engine £7000, car sold on eBay for £2000 as non runner.
Subaru Outback - Subaru Diesels - RT
In a word no, crankshaft bearing failure can be a problem. A colleague of mine at work bought one a year ago, 60000 miles, full Subaru history, £8500 I think he paid but may be wrong, a year later (a few weeks ago, 72000 miles) crankshaft bearing failure, car grinds to a rattly halt. Replacement engine £7000, car sold on eBay for £2000 as non runner.

I had an '06 Outback 2.5 petrol - fantastic car, nothing ever went wrong, but the fuel consumption was dire.

I looked at the diesel Subaru when it was launched but soon heard tales of woe about the manual transmission.

I test drove the Outback diesel CVT when that was launched, superb drive but a new CVT, no thanks.

The fact that Subaru have never increased the power output beyond the 150 bhp it launched with, paltry for a 2.0 turbo-diesel, supports Ian's point above.

Subaru Outback - Subaru Diesels - SLO76
The petrol engines of this vintage are mostly belt driven (due every 5yrs or 60k, though some are longer) but the Diesel is chain. DMF failure is common and DPF issues are not unusual plus failed injectors are a big worry as they're hugely costly to replace thanks to access issues on the flat 4 arrangement.

A great engine while all is going well but faults are much more common than on the tough petrol motors. To be fair it's probably no worse than other modern diesels but costs are much higher when things do go wrong thanks to obscene dealer parts in Britain (they're massively cheaper in other markets, where they go for volume) and access problems. I'd stick with petrol on Subaru, in fact it's a car I'd buy if they'd offer a 2wd option and the reduced costs this would introduce. I've always liked them to drive but as with 95% of drivers I don't need 4wd and don't want to pay the higher tax and fuel costs.
Subaru Outback - Subaru Diesels - gordonbennet

I'm a big fan of the marque, but as said petrol only, we have an elderly 3.0H6 Outback converted to LPG, chain cam, and it simply never puts a foot wrong, my wife wants another Scooby when this one eventually dies.

They made a big mistake with the Diesel, quite why they didn't Dieselise the 2.5 or 3.0 litre keeping the power lowish but the torque high i haven't a clue, i'm sure they could have persuaded Toyota to provide the ECU for it, Toyota ecu's being very difficult to remap.

Those Diesels which have self destructed at silly miles i would like to know if there is a common factor, such as extended servicing, neglect as in never checking the level, or lack of sympathy by driving the engine hard from cold.

Edited by gordonbennet on 17/04/2017 at 09:20

Subaru Outback - Subaru Diesels - corax

A young relative proudly showed me his new (for him) 08 Outback yesterday. This had replaced a troublesome 05 diesel Passat. In fact I did not even know he had brought the Passat as he only had it a short time. Going around the car I noticed the words "Boxer Diesel".

Unfortunately this shows that you need to do your research on specific engine choice e.t.c and not just think that "it's a Subaru, it's reliable". The 2.5 petrols aren't free from trouble either with head gasket issues.

He might be OK with it, but I wouldn't fancy owning one wondering when something will go pop. Even if you had a cast iron warranty, it's just inconvenient to have to go through all the trouble of replacement.

Subaru Outback - Subaru Diesels - madf

In 2011 Subaru totally redesigned the diesel with revised crankshaft - to prevent failures, new EGR valves - to prevent failures- and new injection system - to prevent failures.

The DMF was redesigned - to prevent failures.

The delaers have little expertise and engine spares are ££££s.. Literally.

Even now, if there are faults, the Owners Clubs are basically unable to help...

Petrol? OK.

Diesel ? Are you feeling lucky punk? (C Eastwood) And that's only today..

I would never buy a Subaru diesel.. (The problems are EU and Australia wide)..

Google Subaru diesel crankshaft failure...

Edited by madf on 17/04/2017 at 17:58

Subaru Outback - Subaru Diesels - madf

Further to my post above:

I quote from a SUbaru forum

"Hello Folks. Just thought I'd make my first ever post on a forum to say whilst I love my 2015 Forester diesel CVT, and the main dealer is being very helpful, I am worried. First glow plug incident occurred at 14000 miles with all the accompanying warning lights. The second occurred at 17000 miles. The offending plug and module is being replaced this time. It's still a new car, it is the Euro 6 compliant model, and frankly I am worried about both it's reliability and Subaru's bizarre approach to allowing main dealers to holding spares for what is clearly a known fault. Also the car very occasionally (usually on short drives or up steep hills from a standing start) splutters and loses a bit of power and then seems to 'clear it's throat' and drive normally. I don't know how to describe it but in the old days it would have felt like fuel line

blockage/dirty fuel but it clears itself. Any thoughts?

The trouble is I actually really like the car and the dealer, otherwise it would be gone already!"

uk.subaruownersclub.com/forums/topic/3542-glow-plu...3

POC.

Edited by madf on 17/04/2017 at 21:08

Subaru Outback - Subaru Diesels - RaineMan

Thanks for the replies. Seems much as I thought. Unfortunately, despite the Passat experience he seems obsessed by mpg above all else (although a small car is not an option). I find it disappointing that a number of people look at mpg rather than overall running costs sometimes losing so much in depreciation they could have run a larger and more comfortable car. But then someone else went from a mid-sized hatch to a large people carrier when they started a family – I don’t think they have ever used all the space! Here is nothing as strange as people!

Subaru Outback - Subaru Diesels - daveyjp
Just had a quick look at that thread. Two posters who do well below 10,000 a year complaining their diesels are suffering problems.

2012 car which had done 36,000 in four years and the one above 17,000 in 2 ish years.

When will car buyers learn? Diesels thrive on high mileage. Low mileage kills them.
 

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