Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - Steveieb

Just noticed the number of new registered 17 plate cars especially Mercedes.

Are they doing amazing PCP or other deals as you see people who would normally be driving a run of the mill car now changing every three years for a prestige brand especially MB.

Low interest rates or what?

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - gordonbennet

Shifting as many as possible in case we end up leaving the EU without a suitable agreement and they have to lay off a quarter or more of the workforce due to WTO tarriffs?

No i doubt it will happen either, i have no doubt the agreement when our remainers in charge have finished capitulating will make Brexit a result in name only, but you can't blame Merc for hedging their bets.

Whatever the reasons it seems as if they've making hay before the coming storms arrive, from either direction and for different reasons, changes Europe forever.

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - Fishermans Bend

C-class now in top ten best sellers. Mercedes have been offering great PCP on many models, lower depreciatioon than most. C looking like a shrunken S-class helps. They appear very blobby and bloated to me. Too much technology to go wrong when they end up being bought after PCP owners.

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - barney100

Mercs certainly have lots of technology and indeed can be very expensive to fix if you aren't careful. I've had four now and when things go wrong I find an indie specialist. Ex. Fabric roof mechanism on CLK kaput. Main dealers had wanted megabucks but local indie took it in, diagnosed a sensor, charged a £100 and this was mostly labour getting at the sensor. I got interested in Mercs on holiday on Rhodes years ago when I noticed loads of taxis with huge mileages were Mercs and the drivers hammered them day in day out.

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - Engineer Andy

It could be because:

Many smaller MBs were in the previous VED groups A - D (E being still below the new one for those registered after April 1st, but only by £10), and many larger/more powerful models were priced over the £40k mark, meaning both would see a significant VED penalty if they were registered as new after the April 1st deadline. The same probably goes for many of the 'prestige' makes other than the really high end ones (who rightly think their customers don't care).

I suspect that most manufacturers had a big sales drive in the past 6 months to get as many cars sold before the deadline, as many 'ordinary' cars would have an extra £110 - £140 slapped onto their VED rate, making them less attractive to buyers, especially low emmission cars under the 100g/km CO2 mark.

Saw a news item yesterday saying that footfall in car showrooms was significantly down since the change in VED rates (comparitively to previous years). Ironically, the next few months might then be a good time (say, near to the next reg change) to buy a new or pre-regged car, as there probably are lots of them about and dealers keen to make the next quarterly/6months sales figures. Its not as though list prices will be coming down any time soon, given the lower value of the pound, which won't probably bounce back unless and until a (hopefully) successful Brexit negotiation is concluded.

Last summer there appeared to be a LOT of VAG (especially VWs) cars flooding the pre-regged/nearly new market (I saw loads available on Motorpoint as RHD Euro imports at 25% off, some base model Golfs and diesels still there), probably as a result of an initial drop in sales following the outbreak of 'dieselgate'. This sort of thing seems to go in spells these days - I suppose we just have to keep an eye out for the next round of bargains.

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - brum

Why so many Mercedes? Ive contemplated asking the very same question several times over the last few months.

The puzzling thing is the large number of very young and lower social classes driving these brand new white C220 coupes. Low end council estates even have large numbers parked up there.

Mercedes must be giving them away with very cheap pcp deals or their credit checking is flawed.

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - mss1tw

I wonder what it will do for the brand.

I remember when Merc really was a premium brand.

Now every scumbag who can credit has one.

See also: Audi

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - brum

The Bank of England has flagged up new concerns about the rapid growth in consumer borrowing as Britons rack up debt on credit cards, car purchase schemes and personal loans

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - RT

We've had low interest rates since the 2008 banking crisis so that's not the reason.

It's a process that's been going on for decades - those who buy/lease new cars and change every three years have gradually moved from mainstream brands to premium brands, albeit a smaller model - M-B have benefitted from this by the introduction of smaller models, in conjunction with Nissan-Renault who share many parts.

The effect of the prestige brand image is to increase demand for 3-5 year old used models which increases the residuals of the new cars, making them cheap to lease or PCP.

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - SLO76
Competitive PCP and lease rates combined with some pretty attractive styling both inside and out. Improved quality over recent years and driver enjoyment has risen dramatically too. They're selling well because they deserve to be. Hopefully longterm reliability has improved along with it and us tight fisted used punters can enjoy them later on.
Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - Avant

Agree absolutely. The great majority of new cars bought privately are on PCPs (and why not, with low interest rates?), and if you go for a model that holds its value well, there are good deals to be had. If a prestige badge costs the same or not much more each month than a non-prestige make, people are going to go for it.

When we decided to replace SWMBO's Mini late last year, a VW Up, Skoda Citigo or Hyundai i10 topped the shortlist. But we ended up with an Audi A1 with the 1.4 TSI petrol engine - one of the most impressive cars we've had. Very lively and nippy, comfortable and spacious in the front (important as SWMBO has back and knee problems) and - an unexpected bonus this - more economical than my diesel Volvo on both short and long journeys.

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - brum

www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/14/drivers-face-c.../

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - expat

I am afraid that I am very old fashioned about these things. I pay cash for cars and for everything except houses. If I can't afford to save up to buy it then I can't afford the monthly payments either. I have been buying cars at 18 month old when large cars have depreciated to nearly half of what the list price new was. I then keep them well serviced and run them till they are no longer economic to do so. My last car did me for 25 years. I have had the current one for 12 years now and have no plans to replace it. As far as impressing the neighbours go I couldn't care less. I can sleep at night knowing I don't owe anyone anything.

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - RT

I am afraid that I am very old fashioned about these things. I pay cash for cars and for everything except houses. If I can't afford to save up to buy it then I can't afford the monthly payments either. I have been buying cars at 18 month old when large cars have depreciated to nearly half of what the list price new was. I then keep them well serviced and run them till they are no longer economic to do so. My last car did me for 25 years. I have had the current one for 12 years now and have no plans to replace it. As far as impressing the neighbours go I couldn't care less. I can sleep at night knowing I don't owe anyone anything.

I'm old-fashioned too - but I can't escape the arithmetic of near-zero PCP interest rates compared to healthy unit trust returns of around 7% after tax.

The "problem" with buying used is that you have to settle for someone else's choice of options - the only way I could get what I wanted was a factory order to get the luxury without the bling - I did negotiate a big discount though - yes, I've taken a bit hit already in depreciation but over the 15 year expected life, it's not too bad.

Mercedes - Why so many new Mercedes - expat

The "problem" with buying used is that you have to settle for someone else's choice of options - the only way I could get what I wanted was a factory order to get the luxury without the bling - I did negotiate a big discount though - yes, I've taken a bit hit already in depreciation but over the 15 year expected life, it's not too bad.

I prefer the base model with no options. Less to go wrong and in the long term that counts. I don't want leather seats - too cold in winter and hot in summer. I don't want big alloy wheels. The smaller steel wheels give a more comfortable ride and are less likely to get damaged on kerbs. I don't want diesels, turbos, dual clutch gearboxes, lane departure warnings, electric handbrakes, touch screens, etc. It is getting hard to think of a new car without those things so I will stick with the old one. However I do understand that people do want those things and I don't knock them for it.

As for zero interest rates and investing the money elsewhere I can see the benefit in that also provided you can access that money quickly to pay out the lease if needed such as being laid off or other financial calamity.

 

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