£20 city diesel tax planned - Fishermans Bend

Sensible move.

www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/industry/daily-diesel-t...s

£20 city diesel tax planned - Vitesse6

Yes it is sensible. No one protested when the clean air acts were brought in to end the pollution from coal burning open fires. The only difference between that and diesel pollution is that you could see the coal smoke.

£20 city diesel tax planned - sandy56

In some cases it may be sensible but diesel motorists are being unfairly penalised by this proposed new scheme. People bought diesel cars because they were encourgaed by the government. They cannot bring in new laws overnight and penalise millions of motorists.

The government acted badly in encouraging the mass purchase of diesel cars, they did not read the research which showed the true facts of diesel usage. USA and Japan did the research and acted on it, that is why there is so few diesel cars in Japan and USA. The government used advisers who were acting on behalf of some of the big motor manufacturers. In other words the government did not follow their own scientific advisers.

Why should the motorists be punished for government incompetence? If the government now wants us to move away from diesel fuel it needs to give us official notice and reasonable time to change, I would suggest a timescale of three to five years.

£20 city diesel tax planned - RT

In some cases it may be sensible but diesel motorists are being unfairly penalised by this proposed new scheme. People bought diesel cars because they were encourgaed by the government. They cannot bring in new laws overnight and penalise millions of motorists.

The government acted badly in encouraging the mass purchase of diesel cars, they did not read the research which showed the true facts of diesel usage. USA and Japan did the research and acted on it, that is why there is so few diesel cars in Japan and USA. The government used advisers who were acting on behalf of some of the big motor manufacturers. In other words the government did not follow their own scientific advisers.

Why should the motorists be punished for government incompetence? If the government now wants us to move away from diesel fuel it needs to give us official notice and reasonable time to change, I would suggest a timescale of three to five years.

It's likely to apply to pre-Euro 4 diesels, so at least 12 years old - there won't be that many of those left.

This is official notice! Expect the ban to move up to Euro 4 in a few years time.

£20 city diesel tax planned - oldroverboy.

Pre Euro 4 diesels and petrols are not allowed in parts of Lisbon, Portugal already, and undoubtedly elsewhere too!

£20 city diesel tax planned - Ethan Edwards

Any problem in every circumstance. The politicians only answer is ...How about another Tax? And they think this perceived "wisdom" is brand new untested and totally effective.

Why do we put up with leaders like this?

The biggest lie ever. Hi I'm from the Government and I'm here to help you.

£20 city diesel tax planned - Fishermans Bend

I remember reading in Car magazine about diesel not being good. Most have bought diesel thinking about thd money they save rather than any perceived environmental benefits.

£20 city diesel tax planned - RT

Any problem in every circumstance. The politicians only answer is ...How about another Tax? And they think this perceived "wisdom" is brand new untested and totally effective.

Why do we put up with leaders like this?

The biggest lie ever. Hi I'm from the Government and I'm here to help you.

London would like to ban these vehicles altogether - that is draconian - so tax it as a disincentive to persuade owners to change

£20 city diesel tax planned - diddy1234

if all diesels were banned, how would any goods be delivered ?

Lack of forward thinking with no alternative yet again.

cut your nose off to spite your face comes to mind here

Edited by diddy1234 on 05/04/2017 at 00:03

£20 city diesel tax planned - SkodaIan

Banning pre-euro 4 cars (the tax is on both petrol and diesel vehicles) is essentially gesture politics because of the age, and hence very limited number of cars it affects.

Cars this old probably account for less than 5% of all vehicle journeys in a city, so even if owners of these cars just stopped driving would only reduce the pollution by 5%. In reality, the owners will either buy a slightly newer car (which pollutes only slightly less) or just pay the tax and use the car a bit less. This means it will probably be impossible to measure any change in pollution levels as the result of this policy.

As usual with gesture politics though, a small number of people will get absolutely hammered, for no gain to anyone. In this case, it will be the poorer end of London society who need a car or van for their work, so people like newsagents, corner shop owners, window cleaners etc.

If TFL really wanted to reduce pollution in London today, there are two things in their power they could do immediately.

1) Ban Uber (which has led to a huge increase in minicabs sitting in side streets with their engines idling)

2) Accelerate their electric bus and taxi implementation programmes with large grants to cabbies or bus companies as an incentive to change.

£20 city diesel tax planned - Wackyracer

2) Accelerate their electric bus and taxi implementation programmes with large grants to cabbies or bus companies as an incentive to change.

We had the perfect solution until they got rid of them in the 1960's - trolleybuses.

£20 city diesel tax planned - bazza

I don't remember specific initiatives to encourage purchase of diesel cars from the government. If I recall, Vehicle excise duty was structured to reduce CO2 emissions, meaning any small petrol car would also be beneficial tax wise. Or indeed, a hybrid. Of course Toyota saw this coming about 15 years ago, hence the investment in hybrids.The French government did indeed encourage diesel purchase by slashing fuel taxes, and it is still even today cheaper to buy DERV over there. In the UK, we have never had a fuel tax structure to encourage diesels.

Manufacturers also must take some responsibility, as the forthcoming death of the passenger car diesel is undoubtedly hastened by the lack of trust with the industry following VW/Audi debacle and mis-handling. A pity, as the modern diesel is cleaner than its ever been and there is a danger of all diesels being tarred with the same brush.

Interesting times ahead. I've already decided my next vehicle will be a switch to petrol, as there's no longer a benefit for me at least to drive diesel. A pity, as I like the characteristics, but modern petrol units can almost match them now.

 

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