Cavalier estate - Fishermans Bend

Only thinking the other day I haven't seen one of these for a long time. The best part naturally came from Holden. www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Vauxhall-Cavalier-1-6-GL-Estate...a

Cavalier estate - diddy1234

intersting in that that car is automatic and looking elsewhere around ebay at most of the surviving Cavaliers and Astra's of similar age are also automatics.

Why ?

I thought the manual cars would have been made in larger numbers and also that the automatics were less reliable overall

Any idea's why ?

Cavalier estate - SLO76

intersting in that that car is automatic and looking elsewhere around ebay at most of the surviving Cavaliers and Astra's of similar age are also automatics.

Why ?

I thought the manual cars would have been made in larger numbers and also that the automatics were less reliable overall

Any idea's why ?

The reason for the higher survival rates among automatics is down to them mostly being owned by older, usually wealthier and more attentive owners who kept them longterm and properly maintained them even when the costs outweighed the cars value. As a dealer we bought in every small to medium sized auto we could find at auction as they were almost always lower mileage full historied stock that required no paintwork. Few rivals had much of a range in autos at the time while we could offer variety. But it was clear they were less likely to be driven hard or abused and thus the number of survivors. I doubt this will continue with today's overcomplex CVT and automated manual boxes which will be uneconomic to repair when any complex electronics fail.
Cavalier estate - SLO76
Always liked the Mk II Cavalier. Robust, simple and I always liked the way they looked. Strange the estate never sold well but dealers never really pushed them for some reason. I flogged loads of Mk II smokers in the 90's and most buyers were happy.

Cavalier estate - Andrew-T
Always liked the Mk II Cavalier. Robust, simple and I always liked the way they looked. Strange the estate never sold well but dealers never really pushed them for some reason.

When my kids became teenagers I swapped my last Maxi for a 1983 Cav Estate. I think they were about £7500 new, and mine was an ex-rep's car, 9 months old with 23K miles, for £4750. Kept it for four years and 40K, nice spec but chocolate-brown paintwork was a bit of a minus.

Cavalier estate - SLO76
"When my kids became teenagers I swapped my last Maxi for a 1983 Cav Estate. I think they were about £7500 new, and mine was an ex-rep's car, 9 months old with 23K miles, for £4750. Kept it for four years and 40K, nice spec but chocolate-brown paintwork was a bit of a minus."

Had some cracking 70's/80's colour schemes in the early Mk II's. Green and red seats in some of them were hard work... loved selling them though, was rare anything went wrong. To be fair they really didn't have anything on them to go wrong though, it was all pretty spartan stuff. I actually wish you could still buy a basic family sized car today without all the unnecessary gubbins that goes haywire at 7yrs plus.
Cavalier estate - RT

Only thinking the other day I haven't seen one of these for a long time. The best part naturally came from Holden. www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Vauxhall-Cavalier-1-6-GL-Estate...a

Opel didn't/doesn't like estates - when Vauxhall operated autonomously within GM, they built estate versions of their saloons but that ended when Opel took responsibility for design/development in Europe so the Cavalier mk1 and early Cavalier mk2 had no estate versions.

It was fortunate that Holden and Vauxhall still had production autonomy so Vauxhall were able to ship rear panels from the Opel-based Holden Camira and create the Cavalier mk2 estate - it didn't sell well, primarily as it was never fitted with 1.8/2.0 engines for some reason - and the Cavalier mk3 (Opel Vectra-A) had no estate version.

The Vectra-B did get an estate version but another slow seller - it was only when the Vectra-C estate was announced with 4" longer wheelbase that sales took off. Sadly the Insignia Estate was smaller than Vectra-C.

As an aside, Holden's inovation and value development is now lost to GM with the closure of Holden's R&D and production facilities leaving it to rebadge other models - we can only dream of Opel/Vauxhall/Holden/Buick as GM's global division now.

Cavalier estate - Fishermans Bend

Not long ago Holden was the only profitable division of GM, sadly times change fast. The last Commodore is a cracker. I remember Ian Callum congratulating Mike Simcoe on a great design.

www.wheelsmag.com.au/features/1607/holden-ve-commo...y

www.wheelsmag.com.au/features/1607/mike-simcoe-on-...n

I wonder what will happen to Holden cars imported from Europe if PSA deal occurs?

With regard to there being more auto than manual Cavaliers surviving my guess is the autos are bought by older people who do fewer miles, tend to keep cars for longer, thus more survive.

Cavalier estate - expat

Not long ago Holden was the only profitable division of GM, sadly times change fast. The last Commodore is a cracker. I remember Ian Callum congratulating Mike Simcoe on a great design.

I bought a 78 Holden Kingswood in 1980 and drove it every day till 2005. It is still around town owned by an enthusiast. The reason I sold it was it had no power steering, no automatic transmission and no aircon. Where I am in Australia it sometimes hits 45'C in summer and that gets a bit trying without aircon. Holden made good cars and I don't see anything taking their place. I certainly don't want diesel, DSG transmissions or complicated electronics. Nor do I want a tiny buzz box powered by a lawnmower engine with a hair dryer bolted on top.

Cavalier estate - Andrew-T

With regard to there being more auto than manual Cavaliers surviving my guess is the autos are bought by older people who do fewer miles, tend to keep cars for longer, thus more survive.

I think that is generally true. Most of the Pug 205s which appear for sale are now GTi's. Autos are a good fraction of the rest, usually with 2K or 3K per-year mileages.

Cavalier estate - Falkirk Bairn

In the future if GM no longer have Opel /Vx as the design side for compact/small cars,

where will the future Daewoo/Chevrolet Korean Models come from?

Back to buying old tech from Mitsubishi etc etc & re-skinning the car?

Cavalier estate - RT

In the future if GM no longer have Opel /Vx as the design side for compact/small cars,

where will the future Daewoo/Chevrolet Korean Models come from?

Back to buying old tech from Mitsubishi etc etc & re-skinning the car?

The Daewoo/Chevrolet models now use current GM platforms, have done for a generation

After Opel/Vauxhall abandoned Gamma for the Corsa and used Fiat's SCCS, total responsibility for future Gamma development was transferred to GM Korea (ex-Daewoo) and the Karl/Viva and Mokka use it, both built in Korea although Mokka is now built in Spain as well.

The Delta (Astra) and Epsilon (Insignia) platforms developed by Opel/Vauxhall have been evolved in the US and now used, or about to be used, by Chevrolet, Buick and Cadillac for all their FWD and FWD/AWD models.

By closing Holden development/production and selling Opel/Vauxhall, then GM will have slipped from world #1 global car maker to a regional US/China car company that's stuggling in it's home market - when the China bubble ends, so will GM.

 

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