Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - mss1tw

Wasn't sure to phrase the title so excuse the obscureness...

The 3310 of cars thread got me thinking. I've seen references before to lacklustre chassis/suspension design being rescued by various electronic stability controls/differentials.

Does the same thing happen with modern engine designs? Couldn't get it quite right, but never mind we can patch it up and get it to market with a software alteration!

Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - MikeM100

Does the same thing happen with modern engine designs? Couldn't get it quite right, but never mind we can patch it up and get it to market with a software alteration!

That wouldn't surprise me at all. Bear in mind that software is never ever 'finished' but always 'OK to ship' !

Wait till cars are fully connected to the 'Internet of Things' and can receive over air software updates.

That really will be fun ! I think the expression of unhappiness will be 'my car is bricked'

Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - mss1tw
Gives me an idea for yet another thread - who's starting stockpiling motors from the sweet spot years! (Late 90's early 2000's is the generally accepted range I believe)
Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - JEREMYH
Gives me an idea for yet another thread - who's starting stockpiling motors from the sweet spot years! (Late 90's early 2000's is the generally accepted range I believe)

Me

I run a Toyota Privia d4d 2.0 2000 model

a 96 Saab convertible SE auto

My favorite workhorse a Citroen C15 van on a 53 plate with 80s tec !

I wont be buying anything newer rarther pay more for older good quality buses that I can fix at home

Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - JEREMYH
Duplicate thread.

Edited by Avant on 19/02/2017 at 21:58

Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - gordonbennet
Gives me an idea for yet another thread - who's starting stockpiling motors from the sweet spot years! (Late 90's early 2000's is the generally accepted range I believe)

Yoo hoo, waves...we have no intention of buying anything newer than mid noughties, and then only certain cars.

The recently bought 2005 Landcruiser should have lots of years in it, thats going to be fully rustproofed by me this spring and like our other cars overmaintained.

SWMBO 2002 Outback, the MOT tester reckons that'll run for ever, but if it doesn't then another mid noughties Scooby will replace it.

The mid 90's Merc is only now a summer use car, and when i get the right offer will be sold.

We've now have electronic braking AEBS, a step too far for me, i have no doubt electronic steering not mechanically connected to the car is only a short time away, not in a car i own.

These things are fine and dandy, and if people want all this techonololgy fine, fill yer boots, but lots of us don't and we're not going to.

Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - nailit
That is the beauty of software.... which I have no quibble with, but when it goes wrong big time the consequences can be fatal as in aircraft, which don't really happen do they? no it's the fault of the pilot or driver, or is it?
Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - RT

Boeing Chinook twin rotor helicopter with intertwining blades relies on software to keep the blades from colliding - some software failures causing fatalities were found as pilot error.

The 1994 RAF Chinook accident took Computer Weekly at total of 17 years to get the pilots fully exonerated.

Edited by RT on 19/02/2017 at 18:36

Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - Wackyracer

Does the same thing happen with modern engine designs? Couldn't get it quite right, but never mind we can patch it up and get it to market with a software alteration!

Yes is the short answer, it happens with the piezoelectric injectors. They cannot make them all exactly the same, so they test them and give them a calibration code which is programmed into the cars ECU. The ECU then adjusts its output (current and time duration) to the individual injectors based on these calibration codes.

Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - mss1tw
Interesting, that's what they mean about injectors being coded to a vehicle then. I thought it was some sort of anti-theft
Electronics 'papering over the cracks' - Manatee

I don't suppose any injectors can be made exactly the same so the ability to aim off for that is a great way of dealing with it. If the result is that the injection timing and volume is perfect then it isn't really a fudge.

It's happened with digital photography. The apparent impossibility of making fast high multiplication zoom lenses as small as they are in compact digital cameras is partly explained by having massive distortion, barrel at the wide end and pincushion at the long end, and then fixing this in the image processing. Very useful.

Active suspension for road vehicles may be a similar example. Apart from the ability to vary it, it can presumably be programmed to simulate a spring/damper set up that would be difficult or impossible to manufacture.

 

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