What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - Lrac

I notice quite a few cars are now supplied without a spare wheel does this mean there is an epidemic of stranded motorists ? I seem to suffer about 1 puncture every 3-5 years. I also notice the local tip is often strewn with old nails and screws etc so try to be a bit vigilant.

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - RobJP

Tyre centres aren't supposed to do puncture repairs on run-flat tyres, as they've no idea how far, or for how long, the tyre has been run on no pressure, and damage to the tyre will occur the longer or further it has been run for.

My last puncture was in 2008 - and it wasn't a puncture, but a leaking valve.

Basically, a lot of manufacturers stopped doing spare wheels (and went onto runflats) because it seems a bit silly to carry 30-50kg of weight in the boot for years on end, when it might never be used. By removing that weight they could improve their CO2 figure slightly - and CO2 has been all important to the fleet market and company car drivers.

HJ likes runflats - unless you're very unlucky and get a complete blowout, you're able to get to the next junction on the motorway, and to a safer place than the hard shoulder.

The AA/RAC, etc now carry emergency spares which have different mounting plates, so even if you need to get a replacement tyre, they can keep you mobile.

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - Galaxy

The last two punctures I've had have unfortunately destroyed the tyres.

A can of jallop wouldn't have been much use in either case. Fortunately my car still has a spacesaver spare which got me out of trouble on both occasions.

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - skidpan

Tyre centres aren't supposed to do puncture repairs on run-flat tyres, as they've no idea how far, or for how long, the tyre has been run on no pressure, and damage to the tyre will occur the longer or further it has been run for.

My local independant had a policy where he asked if the tyre had actually been run flat. If you siad yes he would not repair it, if you said no he would. Did 2 repairs for me on the Mini and BMW (both cars alerted me to a deflation and in both cases the pressure was in the mid/high 20's - in both cases I was able to re-inflate immediately) and never had a problem but not all owners are as honest as I would be. There is no way I would risk mine and other road users safety for the cost of a new tyre.

HJ likes runflats - unless you're very unlucky and get a complete blowout, you're able to get to the next junction on the motorway, and to a safer place than the hard shoulder.

That is why I liked them and since there is no way the Mrs could physically change a wheel it would be far better for her to find a nice well lit garage forcourt off the motorway (or even on the motorway) to wait for the RAC than wait on the hard shoulder. I still used to carry a spare wheel on longer trips, one of the winter wheels.

Neither of our current cars have run flats but both have full size spares. Carry a can of gunge for one simple reason, there is no garantee you will not get 2 punctures the same day and one of those might be fixable with a can of gunge.

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - RT

I haven't had a puncture, necessitating the use of the spare in the last 20-30 years - I've had a couple of nails through the tread causing slow punctures but they were handled by daily inflation for a few days until it was convenient to get it repaired.

BUT - I wouldn't ever buy a car with no spare - that might mean negotiating for one if there's room to store it - my present SUV has a collapsible space saver which is full width but shrinks in diameter for storage when deflated (don't ask me how) and also gets a good compressor as standard.

I keep a set of "tyre strings" in the boot which may come in handy one day.

We also have a spare for our caravan as most trailers shred their tyres by the time you realise there's anything wrong.

How long would it take for a breakdown company to get a replacement tyre if you get a puncture out of hours in a rural area - at 7pm on a Friday, probably until midday Monday!

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - Bromptonaut

How long would it take for a breakdown company to get a replacement tyre if you get a puncture out of hours in a rural area - at 7pm on a Friday, probably until midday Monday!

Not uncommon to see cars left on stands at side of road, presumably while wheel is re-shod. My nightmare was possibliity of a Sunday puncture while on a trip to the Outer Hebrides. Nothing except tourists move on a Lewis Sunday.

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - Bromptonaut

Ignoring my Peugeot 104 which had tubed tyres, ironically increasing it's propensity to flats, I've probably had eight or nine in 35years of car ownership. My son has had two in under a year due to kerbing while working as a pizza deleivery driver.

No idea what proportion would be repairable with 'gunk' and no intention of finding out any time soon. Our Berlingo, being based on a commercial vehicle, has a standard size (but steel rather than alloy) spare. Insisted on replacing gunk kit with proper spare when buying my s/h Roomster.

One of The Lad's ripped the sidewall and last of mine went down damn quickly. Hit a pot hole but I'm pretty sure tyre was going down beforehand.

What I do know is that at least four of mine were 'slow' and tyre could be kept in service with reinflation until they could be permanently repaired with a 'mushroom' plug. Gunk makes such a repair impossible.

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - skidpan

What I do know is that at least four of mine were 'slow' and tyre could be kept in service with reinflation until they could be permanently repaired with a 'mushroom' plug. Gunk makes such a repair impossible.

It does not make a repair impossible at all, its the fitters that cannot be ar5ed to clean out the tyre or they are told by their bosses to use it as an excuse to sell you a new tyre.

Never used gunge myself but I know that our local indy will repair such a tyre if like with a run flat it has not been run totally flat and the tyre shows no sign of damage inside. But he does insist you clean it yourself.Hhe lets you use his hose etc.

This is what we carry. Clearly states tyres are repairble.

www.holtsauto.com/holts/products/tyreweld/

Edited by skidpan on 16/01/2017 at 17:34

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - Avant

I don't think percentages or stats will help very much here: it all depends where the puncture is and how big it is.

If it's something like a screw or nail and it's near enough to the centre of the tread, it'll be repairable (less so if the tyre fitter is desperate to meet a quota of new tyre sales). If it's too big or too near the edge, it won't be.

Skidpan's Tyreweld link is interesting: Holts say that 'unlike some of our competitors', Tyreweld doesn't damage a tyre. I'm sure I've read often that the gunk supplied by manufacturers makes a tyre a write off - so there's gunk and gunk. Good point about the possibility of two punctures in the same day.

Edited by Avant on 16/01/2017 at 23:18

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - Andrew-T

Can't remember when I last had a puncture which was sudden enough to notice and make me stop. I've had my fair share of screws or nails in the tread which (as has been said) can be fixed as soon as convenient. My car has a spacesaver spare under the boot floor, but I've never had to unload any luggage to get to it.

The only precaution I take is to make sure that wheel bolts are not so tight that it would be very difficult to change a wheel at the roadside two years after the last time the bolts were touched.

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - NARU

I got a puncture about 200 miles after getting new tyres :-(

I took it back to the supplying tyre dealer*, who said that although it was in the tread, it was too close to the sidewall for him to be allowed to do it. But hinted that it was worth trying elsewhere. He didn't try to sell me a new tyre.

My local tyre specialist said no problem. It's now been in use for a year with no signs of trouble.

* I shouldn't say who it was, but an organisation who play things very straight, in my experience - I'm sure the fitter would have done the repair had he worked elsewhere, but he wasn't about to lose his job by flouting his employer's policies (fair enough!).

Edited by Marlot on 17/01/2017 at 07:14

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - NARU

I'm happy-ish to have no spare on the MX-5. I bought a couple of extra wheels on eBay, and when I needed new tyres, I kept a couple back - so I have a spare which could be delivered to me if someone is home.

On my towcar, I abosolutely want a spare. Being 4x4, it's relatively sensitive to the spare being the same make/model/tread pattern as the other tyres. And I don't want to leave the caravan at the side of the road whilst I'm off getting a punture repaired.

My previous experience of 4x4s is that the fronts wear at about twice the rate of the rears. I therefore have two spare wheels, and swap the two fronts for the two spares every 8-10,000 miles. This means that I need to buy six tyres at once, but I get full use out of all six. Previously, I'd only wear out four, and then have the dilemma of the non-matching spare.

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - RT
My previous experience of 4x4s is that the fronts wear at about twice the rate of the rears. I therefore have two spare wheels, and swap the two fronts for the two spares every 8-10,000 miles. This means that I need to buy six tyres at once, but I get full use out of all six. Previously, I'd only wear out four, and then have the dilemma of the non-matching spare.

That very much depends on the 4x4 and especially it's centre transfer system - many modern SUVs, not the CUV/soft-roaders, will wear the front-rear tyres fairly evenly, reducing the need for regular front-back swaps to keep the tyre diameters equal (within limits).

My previous Hyundai SUV was effectively FWD most of the time, heavy front end which understeered and wore the fronts more than the back - my present VW SUV is full-time 4wd, not front heavy with neutral handling and the tyres are wearing evenly although getting switch from front-rear each spring when changing from winter to summer, and vice versa.

What percentage of punctures are not repairable? - RichT54

In the last 20 years I have had 8 tyres with punctures. 5 were repairable. 2 couldn't be repaired because the nail/screw was too close to one of the sidewalls. The remaining one couldn't be repaired because there were actually two punctures close together. The tyre guy said he thought it had been caused by something like a large staple.

So in my sample 37% could not be repaired.

 

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