Petrol Tow Cars - Kimberley

I am looking to replace my diesel Suzuki Grand Vitara with a petrol tow car, idealy one with an auto to tow a caravan weighing some 1350 Kg.

I do less than 10K miles pa, and I understand your advice for this sort of milage is to go petrol.

The likely candidates that I have seen so far are the Ford Kuga or Kia Sportage, both having a turbo petrol auto option. Are the auto gearboxes on either of these likley to be able to cope, or would you recommend a better alternative?

Petrol Tow Cars - SLO76
What's your budget Kimberly?
Petrol Tow Cars - bazza

Initial thoughts are stick with diesel, otherwise a big meaty petrol motor, I dread to think how hard a small boosted petrol would have to work and how hot it would get, although I guess these circumstances must be designed in. How about a 2.0 petrol Mondeo or Accord? Or a 2.4? Or Subaru Forester /Legacy?

Petrol Tow Cars - skidpan

Initial thoughts are stick with diesel, otherwise a big meaty petrol motor, I dread to think how hard a small boosted petrol would have to work and how hot it would get

Fron 1989 to 1997 I towed the race car on a covered trailer (weighed approx 1200kg) virtually every weekend first with a Golf GTi for 7 years and for the final year with a Golf TDi. Both of those had little power and torque compared to todays turbo engines but coped perfectly well and never got hot.

Our current Leon TSi 140 PS has 184 torques from 1500 to 3500 rpm and a towing limit of 1500 kg. Not towed anything like the weight of the racecar etc but I would expect it to cope brilliantly.

The normally aspirated 2 litre petrols I have driven in recent years have all been pretty dreadful The last one was the Mazda 3 and it was a slug, cannot understand why anyone would buy one. Stick the same but slightly more powerful engine in the bigger Mazda 6 and I cannot see how it would perform any better. Stick some weight behind it and I pity those following. Whilst both have higher outputs than my old Golf both weigh much more and the power band is much narrower.

Since the OP mentions the Kuga 1.5 and the Sportage petrol turbo's I expect they are looking new or nearly new. Personally I would expect either to do the job perfectly but don't forget the Seat Ateca and the VW Tiguan both of which are available with the excellent 1.4 TSi 150 PS motor.

Edited by skidpan on 04/01/2017 at 18:23

Petrol Tow Cars - gordonbennet

The problem with engines and gearing is that you never know what its going to be like getting the combination rolling till you actually test it out for yourself at that weight in less than ideal conditions, presumably this is where caravan magazines (i assume they test tow cars because you hear of towcars of the year) come in useful, maybe an avenue to pursue?

Most engines of a reasonable power output will do the job, its when you find too high first and reverse gears and struggle to get the thing initially moving is where problems occur, and at stall revs of around 800/1000 which is the sort of revs you want to use initially a 1.4 turbo engine isn't going to have the oomph of a 2.0 litre, yes the turbo engine may have better figures and may pull like a train once you get the turbos spinning in its peak torque band, but its getting it there repeatedly, especially on hill starts or maneuvering, but all of this is just discussion really because you won't know if the vehicle suits your use till you try it heavy.

Not everyone is the same hence why some people buy those 2 litre Mazdas because the engine is fine for them, i like old school Diesels that proved almost impossible to stall, unlike the new generation, each to their own.

This is where most old school 4x4's score, and i mean ones with dual range gearboxes (that includes a number of Subarus too if one of those might interest) that come into their own when you want to site your caravan, or if for example you need to hill start it on a really steep gradient, you could slip the vehicle into low range, pull the van up onto level ground, then stop reselect high and carry on without having even warmed your clutch...remember no vehicle as far as i know can be switched from low to high range without stopping and selecting neutral between shifting.

We had a thread not so long ago from someone who had severe trouble dragging his boat out of the drink with a Kia Sorento 2.2 Diesel, high ratio first gear, seemingly weak clutch and no dual range gearbox was very hard on the vehicle, though in my opinion he was expecting this vehicle to do the work of a Defender/Landcruiser/similar either of which in low range would have pulled the thing out on tickover.

BHP to be honest means very little for towing, its torque you need and as much torque as possible from as few revs as possible, but even then if first gear is too high then you could still struggle.

Things i would definately avoid for this are dual clutch or automated manual gearboxes and not sure i'd trust a CVT box either, if you want auto then old school torque converter is the kiddie for towing.

Petrol Tow Cars - skidpan

Most engines of a reasonable power output will do the job, its when you find too high first and reverse gears and struggle to get the thing initially moving is where problems occur, and at stall revs of around 800/1000 which is the sort of revs you want to use initially a 1.4 turbo engine isn't going to have the oomph of a 2.0 litre, yes the turbo engine may have better figures and may pull like a train once you get the turbos spinning in its peak torque band, but its getting it there repeatedly, especially on hill starts or maneuvering, but all of this is just discussion really because you won't know if the vehicle suits your use till you try it heavy.

Have you owned (or even driven) a modern small turbo, I suspect not. My Seat 1.4 TSi pulls like a train from 1500 revs which is where peak torque begins (flat then until 3500). First gear is a usable ratio with the gaps between gears correctly spaced to keep the engine in the operating range. I would expect it to pull a sensibly sized trailer with no issues, Seat quote a towing limit of 1500kg.

The worst car I had for towing was a Mondeo TDCi 130 PS. Loads of power and torques (235 from memory) and the power came in relatively smoothly but first gear was all but useless. It was so short you had to grab second almost immediately at which point the turbo dropped off boost and you had to wait (and wait). Then when it came on boost it set off smartly again but if the road was damp you simply got wheel spin and went nowhere.

Any front wheel drive car can be a pain on hillstarts. The weight is already being taken off the drive wheels by the trailer, the gradient fransfers weight to the rear as well and then when you set off (or try to set off) even more weight is taken off the drive wheels. Apply regardless of turbo or no turbo, diesel or petrol.

Petrol Tow Cars - SLO76
Find it strange when people post on here asking advice then never answer any questions regarding their request. This can't be answered without knowing what budget we're talking about. Is it £5,000 or £50,000?
Petrol Tow Cars - daveyjp

Looks like the OP wants a smallish SUV with a petrol auto so it will be a short list regardless of budget.

Petrol Tow Cars - SLO76

Looks like the OP wants a smallish SUV with a petrol auto so it will be a short list regardless of budget.

If she's talking about sub £15k I'd be looking at the Honda CRV 2.0 auto which while it's not fast it'll be comfortable as hassle free with a nice smooth changing gearbox and 35mpg plus with a light right foot. If £20k upwards and the plan was to change it before it was 5yrs old I'd be tempted by the Ford Kuga 1.5 Ecoboost but it's not one I'd trust longterm like the big Honda. No idea regards towing weights though. But petrol and autobox do not good bedfellows make when towing heavy loads. I'd be tempted to go diesel and just fit a wee run in every week to accommodate the DPF.
Petrol Tow Cars - concrete

I think SLO76 is quite right. When push comes to shove a diesel will always be better for torque at lower revs than a petrol of any aspiration. My Skoda 130pd tdi is great for towing, delivering high torque at quite low revs, when I change vehicle this year I will be faced with a choice of diesel or petrol. While my annual mileage of about 10K is just about acceptable for diesel I also tow a caravan which weighs in at 1300/1350Kg when road ready. I would not mind having a petrol vehicle again but I am just not convinced it would be up to the job without straining.. The major problem is obviously when setting off from a standing start. A certain amount of power(torque) is required to start moving, if that power is achieved at 1700 revs in my diesel but at 2500 in a petrol, surely the petrol engine will put more strain on the clutch and transmission at higher revs. When do you let the clutch in? Even an auto would face the same problem. I am erring towards a diesel. Kuga looks good, Sportage looks good too as does the Honda CRV. Budget of around 20K should get all of these in decent spec, but as a diesel. I suppose before the advent of diesel for family cars most towed with petrol engines, but were the clutches stronger? Were the transmissions better? Was the torque delivery at lower revs in the past? However we have to go with the vehicle we are offered today.

Cheers Concrete

Petrol Tow Cars - kiss (keep it simple)

Torque was certainly at lower revs in the past. When I was a kid in the 70's we were in the market for a new car suitable for caravanning. I recall that 3000rpm was the usual speed for max. torque. Our lowly 1996 1.4 Polo is pretty tourquey too, much quicker off the lights than many more powerful modern cars I have been hiring for work over the last few years. Nowadays you are looking at 4500rpm which is a sure way to burn out a clutch in a hurry.

Petrol Tow Cars - corax

I suppose before the advent of diesel for family cars most towed with petrol engines, but were the clutches stronger? Were the transmissions better? Was the torque delivery at lower revs in the past? However we have to go with the vehicle we are offered today.

Eight valve engines used to be the norm, which, although they could get hoa*** and wheezy at high revs, were better at low and mid range torque.

As regards transmissions, apparently the gearboxes now are being built with smaller sized gears and bearings to reduce weight, but this doesn't bode well with modern high output diesel engines. The old gearboxes would whine but keep going, now they just go bang, depending on how much abuse they've had.

Petrol would be OK as long as the gearing was suitable for towing i.e low first gear.

The old normally aspirated, thirsty and large capacity petrol engines would have no problem.

Bigger is better. Remember those Leyland National buses with the godawful screaming turbo engines? They smoked and were high maintenance. Then they were changed from 8.2 turbocharged straight six to 11.1 litre non turbo horizontal six. They were slow revving, reliable, growling luggers. I always looked forward to going on them (they were identified by black trim around the headlights).

Petrol Tow Cars - RT

I suppose before the advent of diesel for family cars most towed with petrol engines, but were the clutches stronger? Were the transmissions better? Was the torque delivery at lower revs in the past? However we have to go with the vehicle we are offered today.

Caravans were much lighter then! I started with a mk2 Ford Escort 1.6 towing a 800kg gross caravan - the 1.6 Kent was typical of it's era with moderate power/torque and the transmission was a simple 4-speed.

Couldn't tell you if the clutches were good as I never had to replace one!

Petrol Tow Cars - SLO76
"but were the clutches stronger? Were the transmissions better?"

Yes, they were simpler and more robust. I can't remember ever having bother with a clutch until recently when I've had to have two horribly juddering clutches replaced under warranty. One on our current Honda CRV, which is starting to judder again and the other on a VW Caddy van I used for business. Plus the taxi drivers I often dealt via that business are always complaining about clutch and DMF failure.

Both manufacturers replaced them without quibble or charge, the Honda at 24,000 miles and the VW at 19,000 which was pretty good of them. I expected to be asked to make at least some contribution but both done FOC and returned valeted which was good service.

The difference comes down to VW properly investigating why the clutch had failed and Honda it seems did not. With the Caddy the main crankshaft shaft seal had failed and the clutch plate became contaminated with oil causing a nasty judder that decreased as the vehicle warmed up with use. VW replaced the clutch and repaired the leak... problem solved. Honda just bunged another clutch in and put it down to component failure. It's now showing signs of the same problem but not as bad yet. I believe there's oil getting into it.

All the extra complexity in modern engines and transmissions is leading to more common and more costly failures. There's no denying bodywork lasts a lot longer today but I'd love to be able to still buy a new but basic 8 valve Mk III Cavalier, Carlton or a Sierra/Granada today with no DMF, no multi vane turbocharger, complex engine management system or b***** DPF. With modern rust resistance it would last for decades without grief.

Petrol Tow Cars - Avant

As you've liked your Superb, Concrete, but presumably now want an SUV, you could look at the Yeti 2.0 TDI.

Petrol Tow Cars - nailit

Take a look at these links, the Mazda 6 petrol sport 165 (year 2013 on)appears to be a good tow car, of course I am biased as I have one. I too agree that I would be apprehensive/worried about these small turbo'd petrols whether towing or not.

www.practicalcaravan.com/reviews/tow-car/31872-maz...6

www.thetowcarawards.com/tow-car/mazda-6/

www.mazda.co.uk/aboutmazda/news/awards/new-mazda6-.../

Back a few years I towed a caravan (long distances too - Europe wide) with choice of company car, two Cavaliers I remember one a petrol 2 litre CDi and another 1.7TD. the winner IMO was the petrol.

Petrol Tow Cars - concrete

Thank you chaps for some sound advice. Avant: I did look at the Yeti but it does seem a small SUV with quite a low towing capacity. I do like the idea of a 2.0L diesel though, most others seem to offer a tuned 1.6 version. SLO: interesting remarks about your Honda. The CRV was on my radar as I has three Accords before the company went all diesel in about 1994 and Honda did not have a diesel then. They were all excellent petrol engines and excellent cars to drive with total reliability. But again they only now offer a 1.6 tuned up diesel. That is why the Kuga came up, although I am not too sure about Ford as I tend to keep my vehicles and look after them. The Ford may not last the distance, but they offer a 2.0L diesel with a towing capacity of 2000Kg. I am open minded though and would be interested in opions about petrol cars with a decent engine but with a low first gear ratio. I am not a badge snob but I do look at the reliability tables for manufacturers. I suppose I could up the budget a bit and go for larger SUVs such as Santas Fe/Sorrento et al. Time to contemplate.

Thanks again. Cheers Concrete

Petrol Tow Cars - SLO76
I would've opted for an auto had it been available on the 2wd 1.6 diesel but If you want diesel and auto the CRV is expensive as it's only available in higher spec with the 1.6 twin turbo engine that despite Honda's reputation I'm not sure I'd trust longterm especially combined with the stop start systems that is going to kill a lot of turbochargers in my opinion.

I always like to idle mine before turning off so I disengage it by keeping my foot on the clutch at lights etc but an auto won't give you this option, you'd have to just turn the eco mode off. Otherwise you'll suffer carbonisation in the turbo bearings over time. This is another ticking time bomb for modern turbo diesel cars.

I'm not letting my experience with the clutch put me off Honda. I've bought sold and personally owned loads of Honda's over the years without hassle and I'm hoping the new CRV that will come with a new 1.5 petrol turbo will also have the option of auto in the lower to mid specs. Might be worth waiting for.







Edited by SLO76 on 06/01/2017 at 18:22

Petrol Tow Cars - concrete
Thanks SLO. I have read that the 1.5 eco boost petrol Kuga does have a low first gear ratio and is fine for towing, so I intend to test drive one. What you say about Honda is true and they still offer the tried and tested 2.0 V etc petrol engine. That will tow up to 2000kg like the Kuga.I don't particularly want an auto box but Honda only offer this with 4W drive, which again I don't really need. Someone suggested looking at a Dacia Duster, so I suppose I could look at one, but being a 'keeper' I would be happier with proven engineering. I am now somewhat happier about the ability of a petrol engine vehicle to tow with. Especially as I see diesel being demonised from now on and also the DPF and DMF issues with low mileage usage. The search continues. Cheers Concrete
Petrol Tow Cars - SLO76
Two resent posts in technical matters have created a little doubt in my mind regards Ecoboost models. Gearbox problems which might just sway you towards the safe bet CRV.
Petrol Tow Cars - Theophilus
Someone suggested looking at a Dacia Duster, so I suppose I could look at one, but being a 'keeper' I would be happier with proven engineering.

I've no personal experience of a Dacia Duster (or towing for that matter), but I think that the Duster could be regarded as having "proven engineering".

Having been first released on the continent in 2009, and being based on previous incarnation Renault engineering - they've at least had years to sort problems out.

Petrol Tow Cars - SLO76
Renault's 1.5 diesel as used in the Duster has been around for well over a decade and is one of their better efforts. I regularly see Clio's with over 150k rattling around without a care. Plenty of shonky electrics and loose trim to keep the owner entertained but they seem to keep on going if service often enough. The 1.6 petrol is the same as the Nissan Qashqai and again fairly simple and robust.

I have to admit I quite like the honesty of the Dacia Sandero, Logan and Duster but I see the creep of the small capacity turbo petrol sweeping through their ranks with the older normally aspirated units being delisted.

But it's not a car I'd be buying for towing and there's no auto option yet.
Petrol Tow Cars - concrete

Thanks again chaps for your comments. Useful as always. I have been doing some looking, talking and thinking. I am going to test drive a Ford Kuga 1.5 Ecoboost petrol engine tomorrow. My daughter is on her second Ford with an Ecoboost engine, and trouble free to date, and our local dealer is very good. Caravan Club also think highly of the Kuga and the petrol version too. See what tomorrow brings. Here is one for Avant. Out of left field someone suggested looking at a Volvo XC60. I looked at the D4 SE Nav with full leather and was offered an astonishing deal. I rechecked the figures with the dealer and was assured the figures were correct and either 3 or 5 years servicing for 300 or 500 pounds too. I know Avant has a new model Volvo and would value his comments if possible. Also an incredible deal on a new 2.0Tdi SE L Skoda Superb. Now I really am torn although the world now seems to be turning against diesel. Happy days!

Cheers Concrete

Petrol Tow Cars - skidpan

Also an incredible deal on a new 2.0Tdi SE L Skoda Superb.

Why not try the Superb with the 1.4 TSi 150 PS engine. Its got loads of torque for towing, more than the EcoBoost in the Kuga and a towing limit of 1600kg. And its still only £30 VED if you get one before April when the rates change.

I was very interested in the V60 with the T4 engine. 190 PS and 235 torques but unfortunately I could not find a local one to drive, nearest one with the current 2 litre motor was 140 miles away. It should make a superb tow car if its big enough but I seem to remeber having looked at the neighbours Kuga when they bought it space is definitely at a premium in one of those, way smaller thatn the C-Max its based on.

Petrol Tow Cars - Avant

Concrete - my V60 is an automatic SE Nav with the D4 engine, and by first getting a broker's quote and getting the dealer to match it I got a splendid £7,000 off list price. And it came with 3 years' free servicing too. I think there were similar deals on XC60s (this was early this year, but as both models are due for replacement within the next 2 years, I'm sure that good deals will still be around).

Volvo have a strange pricing policy on the V60: there is a fairly basic Business Edition for about £6,000 less than the SE, but with very small discounts available. So not worth it.

In terms of accommodation, it's smaller in overall volume than my previous Octavia estates, but the length in the back with the seats down (which is what counts most of the time) is almost as good, and it can do two things that the Skoda couldn't - the rear backrest splits 40:20:40 instead of just 60:40, and the front seat backrest can be folded forward for a long load.

The XC60 looks much bigger, but the salesman told me that that's virtually all height: length and width aren't much more than the V60. But if you want 4wd you'll need the XC60.

I didn't have the Kuga or C-Max on my shortlist as I'd decided to go for an automatic and didn't fancy Ford's Powershift any more than VAG's DSG. The V60's is an 8-speed torque-converter.

Finally, if you want a petrol, Volvo sell very few and they're hard to get and apparently thirsty. I wan't looking for a diesel but was persuaded into it and having done 13,000 miles since May, maybe it wasn't such a bad decision. The V60 has a 67-litre tank and a heroic 700-mile range between fill-ups.

Edited by Avant on 12/01/2017 at 23:59

Petrol Tow Cars - hillman

GB When I had a manual Siubaru Legacy 2.0 litre petrol I used to use the low ratio a lot. The handbook said that the gearbox could change between low ratio and high ratio on the move up to 18 mph. There is a steep hill approaching my house with a sharp bend with potholes. I used to cruise up the bottom bit in low ratio, carefully round the bend, looking out for joy riders (and potholes), and then change into high ratio on the straight. The potholes are still there and people still drive round the bend too fast.

Petrol Tow Cars - gordonbennet

GB When I had a manual Siubaru Legacy 2.0 litre petrol I used to use the low ratio a lot. The handbook said that the gearbox could change between low ratio and high ratio on the move up to 18 mph.

Thats very interesting Hillman, i never knew a Subaru could perform low to high range on the move, i know centre and axle diffs can be locked on the move so long as both wheels are turning at the same speed (and whilst no danger of wheelspin) but you have surprised me about changing low/high range on the fly...i shouldn't be surprised really because we've been shifting ranges on the proper gearboxes lorries used to have for decades so no earthly reason why not, not going to try it on me Landcruiser auto mind you to see if it works on that..:-)

The 3.0H6 Outback we have is an auto and has no low range, indeed i'm unsure if the 4cyl autos have low range either, Legacy or Forester.

Petrol Tow Cars - RT

GB When I had a manual Siubaru Legacy 2.0 litre petrol I used to use the low ratio a lot. The handbook said that the gearbox could change between low ratio and high ratio on the move up to 18 mph.

Thats very interesting Hillman, i never knew a Subaru could perform low to high range on the move, i know centre and axle diffs can be locked on the move so long as both wheels are turning at the same speed (and whilst no danger of wheelspin) but you have surprised me about changing low/high range on the fly...i shouldn't be surprised really because we've been shifting ranges on the proper gearboxes lorries used to have for decades so no earthly reason why not, not going to try it on me Landcruiser auto mind you to see if it works on that..:-)

The 3.0H6 Outback we have is an auto and has no low range, indeed i'm unsure if the 4cyl autos have low range either, Legacy or Forester.

My 2006 Outback 2.5 4-speed auto had no low range - but with a torque converter it would pull at very low speed in 1st - and it did get limited slip rear diff.

Petrol Tow Cars - concrete

Thanks Avant. On reflection having driven two Kugas' today , one manual and one powershift, both with the 1.5 ecoboost, I was impressed by both. Lots of power and nice to drive with lots of bells and whistles. But I think despite the demonising diesel is in for, I still prefer it for driving and especially for towing. That brings me back to the XC60. A great deal on a diesel D4 R Design Geartronic with Nav and full leather plus the servicing plan and I am almost convinced. I am doing my sums tomorrow with a view to increasing my budget and hope to make a deal next week. My Superb is a great car but at nearly 12 years and 206K I am not confident it will perform and remain reliable for much longer. So I need to act before the towing season gets under way. Very positive and precise information about Volvo, so thanks again. I will keep you informed of my choice.

Cheers Concrete

Petrol Tow Cars - TR7
Ssangyong Korando worth a try. Great towing capacity and reliable too.
Petrol Tow Cars - concrete

I have been doing some serious interacting with suppliers. I have almost settled on the Volvo XC60. D4 SE Nav Geartronoc with full leather, metalic paint and a factory/dealer fit tow bar. The autobox being a torque converter was a huge sway, especially for towing. Just have to finalise the fine detail on Monday between two suppliers. I have decided to lease for 3 years. The price is the same as the depreciation so it is cost neutral and just hand it back when finished. Two lease companies are being very competitive and I am going to run the figures past a local dealer to give him a shot. Then I will place an order. One of the other reasons for leasing was that modern cars are now so complicated that when the warranty runs out I am no longer happy to keep a vehicle. This way for the same price as depreciation I can get a new vehicle every few years and not have any maintenance issues. Thanks for your sound advice Avant. Volvo had not even been on my radar until very recently. Cheers for now. Concrete

Petrol Tow Cars - nailit

"The price is the same as the depreciation so it is cost neutral and just hand it back when finished."

Not being picky but how does the deposit factor in here ? As your calculus certainly pricked my ear so to speak.

Oh and whatever happened to Kimberley the OP ?

Edited by nailit on 14/01/2017 at 19:34

Petrol Tow Cars - concrete

Hello nailit, I think the OP was happy with links you sent, which were good, but obviously forgot to comment on their efficacy!

I worked out the cost of 'ownership' for 3 years via Cash purchase, HP, PCP and Leasing. The biggest cost is the depreciation over the period. They all work out fairly close except the first two require a fair amount of cash upfront. PCP and Leasing are flexible. You can decide how much deposit, which then reflects in the monthly payment. I used examples of 3 months then 35 monthly payments and 6 months then 35 monthly payments and annual mileage of 10K miles. Forget about any equity on the cash or hp deals. This is purely the cost of keeping the vehicle for 3 years. The lease worked out the cheapest and gave the flexibility and wider choice to run a more expensive model than you would normally buy. It may not suit everyone, but it suits me. It can be trickly to establish the true cost because some of the deals are fiendishly complicated. However if you have ever worked out your Gas or Electricity costs then this should be a breeze.

Give it try, all you need is a calculator, notepad and PhD in Applied Mathematics!!!! I am sure anyone could easily master the way the deals are constructed. Off to the pub now for a pre lunch 'swally'.

Cheers Concrete

Petrol Tow Cars - SLO76
Similar thinking led me to lease our CRV. Much shopping around found an excellent online deal that I presented to Honda dealers within easy striking distance to see if any would match it and one did in order to make up numbers. By my calculations the lease including deposit works out around the same as I'd lose in depreciation even with a decent discount and I should hopefully be able to buy it at the end of its term for substantially less than retail if I choose to keep it. Leasing does make a lot of sense especially with higher value cars like this.
Petrol Tow Cars - concrete

That is true SLO76. There are some anomalies where the make/model doesn't seem to stack up against the norm, but in general the deal works out well. As usual the bones need to picked out of it. The devil is always in the detail. I am aware that the vehicle needs to be returned in very good condition, but I always keep our own vehicles in good condition too. I am not sure what kind of deal may be struck for the vehicle at the end of the contract term if I wanted to buy it. I think this is where the supplier may look to make some money. They will have a 3 year old vehicle, in good condition with low mileage, probably a good forecourt attraction and a decent margin to be had. The deal has to suit all parties to be sweet.

Cheers Concrete

 

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