Honda Civic (2001 – 2005) Review

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Honda Civic (2001 – 2005) At A Glance

Roomy and practical interior, tidy looks, refined petrol engines, rear seats fold flat to add to usefulness, well built and reliable.

Not as sporty as a Focus to drive, the 1.6-litre can be too noisy at motorway speeds, potential faults with electric power steering, seems dull compared to the new Civic.

This 2001 Honda Civic may be a world away from its quirky and adventurous replacement, but it does share some similarities. It's just as well built, reliable and well engineered, making the Honda Civic an ideal used car buy that will give you trouble free ownership for many years.

Okay, so it's not the most bold of designs, but it's neat nontheless and three-door Sport models look very much-like the renowned Type-R hot hatch, but without the high running costs. All the engines in the line-up offer reasonable economy too, from the 1.4-litre and 1.6-litre VTEC petrols to the 1.7 CTDi diesel.

But perhaps the best area of the Honda Civic is the clever and well-thought out interior. It feels more like a people carrier with plenty of space and some useful family-friendly features. There's plenty of attention to detail too such as the high-placed gear ever right next to the steering wheel which frees up space. There's also plenty of storage and a big boot.

It's unlikely to get your pulse racing, but the Civic is definitely a car you buy with your head. Cheap to run, durable and reliable, it has plenty to recommend it.

Honda Civic 1.4 and 1.6 5-door 2001 Road Test

Honda Civic Type R and 3-door 2002 Road Test 

Honda Civic CTDi Diesel 2002 Road Test

Looking for a Honda Civic (2001 - 2005)?
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ASK HJ

What's the best used car for under a £1000?
I'm looking for a used car and have £1000 to spend. I want something with a bit of power, motorways at weekends and city driving during week, any suggestions?
Nothing for under £1000 is guaranteed to be problem free or to stay that way, so best to look for something like a Ford that can be repaired reasonably cheaply. If it it was me and I could get one for the money, I'd go for a Honda Civic 2.0 Type S from 2003/2004. It's like a 4-door Civic Type R with the engine detuned to 160PS.
Answered by Honest John
Should I take up the option of a courtesy car following an accident?
Should I take up the option of a courtesy car following an accident? The extent of damage to my Honda Civic has not been estimated as yet but, bearing in mind that the car is a Y registration, it my well be declared as uneconomical to repair. Prior to the collision, the car was in in excellent condition, having only been driven for 52,000 miles. Following the collision earlier this week, I have had four different people (three from my insurance company) recommend that I take up the offer of a courtesy car as all costs will apparently be billed to the other party. I was rear ended at a roundabout and the third party as well as my insurance company accept that he was at fault.
Important we use the correct terminology here, "courtesy car" is a car provided out of courtesy whilst your vehicle is being repaired by the repairer at no charge to you. The option you are talking of is a "credit hire" vehicle. This is a vehicle provided to you on "credit" as you cannot afford to hire a vehicle yourself. It is very important that you fully read any contract you are looking at entering into. The reason for this is that the providers have to prove you could not have afforded to hire a car yourself and that your are "impecunious". Should it go to court, you may be asked to provide your bank statements to prove you did not have the funds. When you have had an accident that is not your fault, you are fully entitled to be placed in the situation you were in prior to the incident, this includes the use of an alternative vehicle. Advise any company that you want to use that you wish for them to place in writing that they "guarantee" you will not be charged in any way and they guarantee to get the full cost from the at fault insurer. Also have them place in writing to "guarantee" they will have no need for your financial details. If they do all of that, you should have no issues using them.
Answered by Tim Kelly
What car would you suggest for drivers over 70?
My parents are looking to replace their trusty 2003 Honda Civic with something a bit more up to date. They've tried the new Civic but complain it's too low for their aged knees. They are considering the Mazda CX3 but are wondering if that is the best of the bunch or if there is an alternative. They have a 2007 Jaguar XK convertible which they use for long journeys in the UK and Europe but want something more practical for everyday use. Any suggestions would be most welcome.
The CX-3 is lovely, but they could also consider a Peugeot 2008 1.2 Puretech 130 (or 110 with EAT6 auto), or a Honda HR-V, or a Toyota C-HR. Easier to get in and out of, a Hyundai ix20 or a Kia Venga. (The Suzuki Vitara is a bit of a jump from seat to ground.)
Answered by Honest John
Is it time to replace my old 2002 Honda Civic with the newer Honda Civic 1.8 i-VTEC?
I travel 8000 miles a year and need a car to replace my ageing 2002 Honda Civic SE Sport. It's still great to drive but I only use the car at weekends as I go by scooter round London. A Honda dealer has a 1.8 i-VTEC T1 for £9745 on 17-inch wheels with 22,000 miles. I need a quieter car on the motorway now and like Honda reliability and approachable dealers. It may not be a very exciting car but I suppose it's not bad looking. Is it worth a look?
The 1.8 i-VTEC Civic is the Civic to get. Ultra reliable and Real MPG very good.
Answered by Honest John

What does a Honda Civic (2001 – 2005) cost?

Buy new from £16,567 (list price from £19,710)
Contract hire from £185.39 per month
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