Speed limiting technology becomes mandatory on all new cars sold in the EU

Published 06 July 2022
  • New vehicles sold in the EU will have mandatory speed limiters fitted from today (6 July).

  • “Only a matter of time before the UK follows suit,” says an industry expert.

  • Excessive speed is responsible for 27 per cent of fatal collisions in the UK each year.

From today (6 July 2022), new EU rules will require all new cars to be fitted with speed limiters. The new rules are part of the General Vehicle Safety Regulation which is designed to reduce road deaths across the European Union.

The speed limiters will use Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA) technology to reduce road deaths by giving the driver a warning through sounds and vibrations before potentially taking action and reducing engine power. 

The rules will initially apply to all-new models being launched from 6 July, before being extended to all new cars and vans from July 2024. The ISA system will use GPS data and cameras to identify the local speed limit. The ISA system cannot be removed or permanently deactivated, although the driver will be able to switch it off at the start of each journey. 

The Department for Transport (DfT) says the new rules will not come into effect in Great Britain today and no decision has been taken on which elements of the package will be implemented. 

POV-BROLL_08_HR

 "It is only a matter of time before the UK follows suit..."

Despite the DfT's stance, Tim Camm, Technical Training Manager at Autoglass believes it is inevitable the new technology will be implemented in the UK. 

"It is only a matter of time before the UK follows suit and makes more of these advanced safety features compulsory in UK cars, and so it is essential that drivers and the industry alike prepare for these changes regarding how drivers control their vehicles while on the road. 

“This new safety technology will undoubtedly save the lives of many motorists, passengers, and pedestrians. Through GPS, sensors, and cameras, the smart technology can quickly assess the speed limit, alert the driver to slow down, or stop the vehicle where necessary.  

“Automatic emergency braking and other safety technology such as lane departure warnings have already become more common on UK roads in recent years despite them not being compulsory, so it is essential drivers are educated on how to use and maintain this safety technology." 

Speed (7)

What is Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA) and how will it work?

The new rules give vehicle manufacturers four ISA options to choose from. Two of these systems provide short audible warnings and/or vibrations when the speed limit is exceeded.

Two other options will directly intervene when the driver is going too fast, either gently pushing the accelerator back or automatically regulating speed. All of the ISA systems will feature a manual override that will activate when the driver presses the accelerator to overtake or escape danger. 

According to a recent report from the International Transport Forum every one per cent increase in average speed results in a two per cent increase in all road accident injuries and a three per cent rise in fatal and severe crashes.

Are speed limiters fitted to UK vehicles?

Yes, speed limiters have been fitted to UK cars and vans as standard or optional equipment for over 30 years. 

Will Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA) be introduced in the UK?

The Department for Transport is yet to make a decision on the introduction of Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA). However, according to Nicholas Lyes from the RAC, car manufacturers will not be willing to exclude certain features on their cars for the UK market. As a result, the tech is expected to be included on all EU spec cars sold in the UK.

When will Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA) be fitted to all cars?

Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA) is being introduced on 6 July 2022 to all-new models of car and van. It will be mandatory for all new vehicles sold in the EU from 2024.

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Comments

VWCSK    on 7 July 2022

I can see this working well as I’m sure were aware of the accuracy of our satnav’s when it comes to speed limits.

I live on a 20MPH street and my satnav showed it was 30MPH for near on 2 years until corrected to 20 but an update 2 months ago it shows no speed limit at all, maybe they just gave up with councils up and down the country changing speed limits more often than we get a change in the weather.

ALEX BRYANT    on 8 July 2022

The vast majority of Satnavs now have a audible warning when the speed limit is exceeded . . . however . . . some Satnavs don't update the speed limits quickly enough, and for some unknown reason, many B roads and most C roads do not have a speeed limit given.

hissingsid    on 8 July 2022

Another step down the slippery slope towards driverless cars.
Another good reason to hang on to my existing car.

Clarescott    on 15 July 2022

Another step down the slippery slope towards driverless cars. Another good reason to hang on to my existing car.

I totally agree!

JackIoW    on 11 July 2022

A good idea as with the decrease in Police the driving has got worse, particularly speeding. I take the point that speed limits are not updated fast enough, or do not show up at all, but there will still be the signs that we are supposed to be taking notice of. I find it sad that Drivers need all these aids to keep them driving legally. A better option IMO would be to have speed cam technology on GPS. The speeders will pay a fine each time they speed which is fair, as trying to get road deaths down costs a fortune, which the taxpayer picks up.

Pug RCZ    on 11 July 2022

It must be fun driving on the Isle of Wight.

NEIL SCARLETT    on 19 July 2022

It must be fun driving on the Isle of Wight.

Well said sir. I believe that there are plans afoot to reintroduce the man, sorry person, with the red flag walking ahead of vehicles. Would do wonders for the employment statistics.

Chris Ottewell    on 11 July 2022

I works on road signs NOT sat nav! It is very dangerous as the cameras (at least in my car) pick up things like 20 limits on motorway slip road with road works and want to slow me down from 70 to 20 which is wrong as I am continuing straight ahead. Very dangerous indeed it the EU rules which automatically slow you down are applied.

forestgreen    on 11 July 2022

That's a valid point Chris although something has to be done as unfortunately the human being is incapable of self policing on the whole.
The roads are full of i****ic chancers who assume that when they overtaken doing around 70/80 on aA or B Road then cut in 100 yards before the bend that nobody else could possibly be doing the same thing coming the other way.
Very many of these types live in Northumberland believe me as I see them regularly patrolling the A697.

BS6656    on 11 July 2022

Yet another way to control us! Speed itself is not the problem. It is people not thinking ahead, shifting lanes without looking, tailgating!

Clarescott    on 15 July 2022

Yet another way to control us! Speed itself is not the problem. It is people not thinking ahead, shifting lanes without looking, tailgating!

Speed doesn't kill … impact does!

NEIL SCARLETT    on 19 July 2022

Yet another way to control us! Speed itself is not the problem. It is people not thinking ahead, shifting lanes without looking, tailgating!

On phones, texting and using tittle tattle social media site.

   on 11 July 2022

GPS is not 100% accurate with speed limits, which is probably down to councils not updating their data base. There is a B road I use regularly which has a 50mph limit on one section changing to 40 mph. The sat nav shows the whole length of the road as 50mph. Things are made worse by the first 40mph sign visible is 2/3 mile after the 40 zone starts . Going the other direction, the last 40 sign is about 1/2 mile before the 50 zone and the first 50 sign is just before a tight double bend . There is also a garden centre entrance just after the bend so the speed should really be lower. So what will the ISA believe, the data from the GPS or a speed limit sign ? Also, good luck with reading some signs as they are either covered by foliage or filthy dirty and virtually unreadable.. I wonder if the excuse, but my GPS said it was a 50 limit will be accepted if the limit is 40.. And what about the 20mph limits that are appearing, the only signage is a marking on the road surface? . Again the sat nav does not show it.

gogabz    on 11 July 2022

I have to agree with Chris Ottewell's comment about 20 (30 or 40) limits on slip roads etc. I'd also like to add "20 When Lights Are Flashing" signs. Will they have cameras to cope with those?

barnesboy    on 11 July 2022

I note the Dept of Transport said, ‘the new rules will not come into effect in Great Britain today’. Why about Northern Ireland ? It’s in the U.K. but not in G.B. and it has an open border with the E.U.

Gt1    on 24 July 2022

Better than that will it be able to tell which country it is in or will people crossing from the Republic of Ireland into northern ireland have the anchors slapped on at the first mph sign fron 100kmph or 62 mph to 60 kmph at the 1st sign at the border

   on 11 July 2022

Yes they will be implemented here. The difference between high speed roads and slip road speed limits is common between here and the EU and the driver can override the system - just needs drivers to be alert

Pug RCZ    on 11 July 2022

The statistics say that 73% of accidents are NOT speed related, only 27% of them.

Maybe the cars should have alcolyzer testers before allowing a drunk driver to proceed?

Maybe some technology could be developed to stop drug drivers to proceed?

Maybe the powers that be should fit an IQ tester to cars before allowing the driver to proceed?.

NEIL SCARLETT    on 19 July 2022

The statistics say that 73% of accidents are NOT speed related, only 27% of them. Maybe the cars should have alcolyzer testers before allowing a drunk driver to proceed? Maybe some technology could be developed to stop drug drivers to proceed? Maybe the powers that be should fit an IQ tester to cars before allowing the driver to proceed?.

You are correct sir, maybe the IQ test should also be applied to those wishing to post on forums.

Atlanticboy    on 11 July 2022

Hi, HJ has run articles on Mandatory Speed limiter legislation before and I even asked HJ if they could find out if this Legislation was going to be on new cars or just on new models launched after 6th July, they couldn't find out from the Dft.
So when I saw a newspaper add from Jacob Rees Mogg on Brexit Opportunities I emailed him the suggestion that the UK doesn't implement this flawed and draconian technology.
I hope I have played a small part in stopping this invasion of privacy.

Dennis Leeds    on 11 July 2022


A vehicle should always be under the control of the driver otherwise to have speed reduced could in certain circumstances cause a serious accident.

Trevor Coleman    on 12 July 2022

Having worked as a traffic engineer years ago I can see that this idea was dreamed up by committees looking at plans showing roads with clear road markings, immaculate, unobstructed, up to date road signs and satnavs immediately updated with the correct speed limits.
Here in the real world my updated satnav often shows the wrong speed limit and speed limit signs are often obscured or even missing.
Without an override this could be very dangerous.

Zantrop    on 15 July 2022

Couldn't agree more. The reality is that there are times when a sudden drop in limit would be dangerous if the car automatically brakes from 70mph on a motorway (variable speed limit motorways for instance). And there thousands of examples of speed limits which are unsuitable for the location both too high and too low. Lots of occasions with side roads or slip roads off dual carriageways with 30mph limits, so if the car decides that's the limit on the main road and brakes.... Not to mention all the obscured signs through lack of council maintenance.
The most effective speed limit controls currently are average speed zones. I dislike them but they are surely much safer than automatic systems. I'll be turning off any auto system every time I get in the car. Or just won't buy a new car. Is it coincidence that the other current headline is record low new car sales...

john Boxall    on 12 July 2022

I have long suggested that there should be some sort of mandatory top speed limit on all cars registered in the UK, - given that the maximum permitted speed on a public road in the UK is 70 mph it seems bizarre that perfectly legal vehicles can do well over 100

jchinuk    on 12 July 2022

Oddly, most electric cars seem to be sold on their frankly stupid acceleration and top speeds.

Many cars have sub 6 second 0-60 times, I suggest few drivers have the brains capable of controlling a car at those speeds.

4caster    on 12 July 2022

Few people buy electric cars for their high power.

We buy them for their low running costs (free in summer if we can charge them from our own solar panels) and for their zero emissions at the point of use.

forestgreen    on 13 July 2022

Totally agree. For me it's not even the fact that cars will easily exceed the maximum speed limit it's more to do with the way that cars are driven. I've always thought that new drivers should be limited in cc or hp until they are at least 21 but I'm not sure that's even enough. I'm not just picking on the young but there is no doubt that most of them cannot deal with a car with 250hp without thinking that they are Lewis Hamilton.

hissingsid    on 12 July 2022

Why are we even considering implementing this nonsense?
I did not vote leave to continue to be bound by EU dictats.

4caster    on 12 July 2022

No government minister or official to my knowledge has said we are going to follow suit.

This is mere speculation on Honest John's part. But uncannily HJ is often right.

Clarescott    on 15 July 2022

Why are we even considering implementing this nonsense? I did not vote leave to continue to be bound by EU dictats.

Exactly!

4caster    on 12 July 2022

After the semi-automatic speed reduction has taken place upon entering a lower speed zone, will the car accelerate semi-automatically upon entering a higher speed limit zone? Of will it continue to trundle along at 20 or 30 mph?

Neil McGrath    on 12 July 2022

Are they going to fit these to BMW and Audi Cars? Wow! The limiters will drive the owners crazy! Well done EU. At last something that will make these drivers obey the law.

Paul Jenkinz    on 15 July 2022

will traffic police get same technology

christopher caddy    on 17 July 2022

What is the problem with having speed limiters put on your car. If you drive legally you don’t need to go above the speed limit anyway?? Just think of all the speeding fines it would save you!!

Gt1    on 24 July 2022

Again UK and eu units aren't the same but the signs are 100kmph means 62. 80 equils 50. 50 equils 31 plenty of scope for computer messing up and slamming on brakes miss Reading signs. Especially at uk's land border expect to see rear endings at clones

May even mess up on main land who knows

Edited by Gt1 on 24/07/2022 at 05:08

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