I have a question Volume 67 - Hugo {P}
*****This Volume is now closed. Please see Volume 68, which can be found here*****

www.honestjohn.co.uk/forum/post/index.htm?t=29866


In this thread you may ask any question for which you need help, advice, suggestions or whatever.

It does not need to be motoring related. In fact, in this thread it should not be.

No Questions About PC's. They now go in another Thread.
No politics
No Speeding, speed cameras, traffic calming
No arguments or slanging matches
Nothing which I think is not following the spirit of the thread
Nothing that risks the future of this site (please see the small print for details www.honestjohn.co.uk/credits/index.htm )

Any of the above will be deleted. If the thread becomes difficult to maintain it will simply be removed.

However, as has been said a couple of times, there is a wealth of knowledge in here, much of which is not motoring related, but most of which is useful.

This is Volume 67. Previous Volumes will not be deleted,

A list of previous volumes can be found here:-
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PLEASE NOTE:

When posting a NEW question, please "Reply to" the first message in this thread, i.e. this one. This keeps each question in it's own separate segment and stops each new question from getting mixed up in amongst existing questions. Also please remember to change the subject header.
Phishing scam on an old driver - buzbee
Anyone come across this one?

Just heard of a new Phishing scam from a man in the Midlands.

Elderly chap rung up and asked if he was interested in a very good low cost insurance policy that paid a good lump sum in the event of death. How old are you etc. In the process he was asked what area he lived in and "just give me your card number and I will be able to give you a quote". The old chap was then offered a very good deal. "Can I put you down as interested then and send you a brochure to look at" Yes, OK. Right, just give me the number off your cheque book (account number) etc., for the notes here. And so it was going to go on. Fortunately the old chap rumbled it and terminated the call. Needless to say, trying 1471 did not reveal the caller's number.
New for old insurance - Mapmaker
Thanks Mark. That's rather more helpful than the girl from Direct Line whom I've just rung. 'Well, it means New for Old.' 'So what if the item is very old?' 'Well, it means like for like.' 'Isn't that what you have with a car?' 'Yes.' 'So that allows for depreciation, doesn't it?' 'Errr, yes.' 'So that's not New for Old, is it?' 'No, that's a motor car policy.' 'But you just said that was what New for Old meant.' 'No, that means we pay you the new cost.' 'So what if the item is very old...' etc.

Poor girl didn't have a clue.
New for old insurance - Ex-Moderator
The girl's expertise is customer service, not insurance knowledge. These insurance companies set them up to fail by not teaching them how to deal with technical queries.

Like I say, you wouldn't ask a checkout person in Tesco's how the vegetables are grown.
New for old insurance - Altea Ego
YOur are being pedantic mappy. YOu know what it means, the girl was trying to explain what it means, and you were just trying to score points and confuse her.

YOu know as well that if you have any particular antiquity, rare item, or very expansive single object it needs to be listed on the policy.
New for old insurance - Mapmaker
No, RF, I actually don't know what it means (see IHAQ vol 66). I did hope that Direct Line's claims helpline would be able to explain. If I am to be fully prepared to negotiate with the loss adjuster on Monday (and so not let this drag on for ever & ever), I need to be forearmed with my own rough estimate of value under the valuation model that he will be using. I find it difficult to believe that my Regency dining chairs would be replaced with Ikea dining chairs.

And fortunately I do not own a single thing - not even (particularly not!) my car (save for the car on a new-for-old basis) - that is 'worth' in excess of £1,500 and therefore requires listing!
Best place for well priced furniture - Hugo {P}
We need to furnish a rented property soon.

The dining table and chairs I have found were an absolute snip. I got a good functional yet good looking set new for a song. £55 from Focus (do it all)!

However we are looking for a small 2 seater settee and chair, pine TV table, pine coffee table and a pine bedroom set.

We have looked in all the usual places, Argos, Index and Ikea for insperation. I thought I would widen the search by asking if anyone knew of any good sources for well priced new or nearly new furniture for property to be rented out.

I am on the Devon/Cornwall boarder and, yes I will be going to Trago Mills soon.

I am willing to look at stores local to me and the internet/mail order.

Previously we have made do with some of the better stuff we've finished with to attract and retain tenants. We do have some pine bedroom furniture we could put in but firstly there is not a complete set and secondly its condition is not great - scratches and/ or wardrobes that have been re assembled too many times.

H
Best place for well priced furniture - Ex-Moderator
The local house clearance auction ? We've always doen rather well at those when trying to solve the same problem as you.
Best place for well priced furniture - Hugo {P}
Yes, thanks Mark - definitely worth a look.

The soft furnishings obviously need to be fire regs compliant, but the rest, really just needs to match/suit each other within each room. As for the bedroom set, new out of a box would give us the advantage of the wife being able to assemble and deal with it without my needing to help, whereas used may have to be dismantled to get it into the house anyway, which always carries the risk of damage. The problem is that I'll be fitting a new kitchen and bathroom at the property.

Oddly enough I took some of my late mother's stuff down to a couple of these. The stuff I took wouldn't have suited anyway. I'm rather miffed I didn't take the fridge freezer in the end though, as it would have just been up our street. We left this in the house as it was quite a few years old by then and may have caused problems. At least we have a washing machine though.

I'm also after a gas or electric hob on its own, preferably in stainless steel to match the oven we have. Long story but I bought a single oven off Comet Auctions some time ago for another project and it's sat in a corner of a disused part of our house ever since.

Trago Mills may be my first port of call again for this.

Thanks again.

H
Best place for well priced furniture - Welliesorter
Any weekend colour supplement will have ads for reasonably priced sofas by mail order. For a long time I wondered why the suppliers of these all seemed to be in various parts of South Wales. A quick Google revealed (news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/1576154.stm ) that these firms are all part of a group called Thomas Lloyd.

I bought two very well made sofas from one of these (Kirkdale) about nine years ago and a change of removable covers later (the originals are still fine) they're still going strong.
Best place for well priced furniture - NowWheels
Hugo, you may have solved the furniture problem by now ... but if not, did uou see IKEA's range of chunk furniture which is made from some sort of recycled pulp, covered in pine veneer?

I think that rrange is called "LACK", and it's very cheap -- coffee table was about £14 when I got one. Looks quite nice (modern chunky design), and at that price it's a disposable item.
Vacuum cleaner recommendations - Robbie
Can anyone recommend a decent, inexpensive, bagless, cylinder vacuum cleaner? I've recently bought a holiday home in France and I'm taking as much stuff over there as I can. They are quite expensive in France.
Vacuum cleaner recommendations - Civic8
Only one I would recommend is the Dyson..But Currys do a fair amount.www.currys.co.uk around £60-£80 mark
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Steve
Vacuum cleaner recommendations - Robbie
We have a new Dyson Animal at home but I'm looking for a recommendation from someone who has knowledge of an INEXPENSIVE bagless cylinder type.

I've been to all the online sites - and Pricerunner - but can't see any reviews of cheap ones.
Vacuum cleaner recommendations - L'escargot
I concur your decision to go for a bagless. The power of our Electrolux 5116 bagged cylinder type is such that on full power it sucks the bottom out of the paper bag! If we were to use it on more than half power the cost of replacement bags would be astronomical ~ and I was so looking forward to being able to exploit it's max power of 1600 watts. Vroom vroom doughnuts or something!
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L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
Vacuum cleaner recommendations - Focus {P}
www.ebuyer.com do the 'In-Cuisine CC100 1400W Compact Bagless Cylinder Vacuum Cleaner' for £18.99 - tinyurl.com/4ow8f . It gets good reviews from buyers.
Vacuum cleaner recommendations - Martin Devon
Can anyone recommend a decent, inexpensive, bagless, cylinder vacuum cleaner?
I've recently bought a holiday home in France and I'm taking
as much stuff over there as I can. They are
quite expensive in France.

Can be used with or without bag, but with, better. HENRY is the only vacuum cleaner worth a carrot. Trust a builder who works on very old properties. Ignore this at your peril!!!

Very best regards. M.
Vacuum cleaner recommendations - PhilW
Strangely enough Martin, I was going to post exactly the same but thought I'd better not since it's not exactly a specialist field of mine! Wife often talks to a "lady who cleans" and a constant theme of hers is how useless Dysons are and how brilliant Henrys are.
Wife also recounted how a friend had just bought a Dyson, but it doesn't pick up the hairs from the multiple cats, dogs and other wildlife they accommodate. She has rung Dyson and they are sending round a specialist to advise her!
We have some really interesting conversations in our house!
Mind you, I know more about "Hoovers" than cars!
Our Panasonic is pretty good (I hear!!) - but shouldn't a Panasonic play CDs and Cd roms while you "Hoover"?
Vacuum cleaner recommendations - Stuartli
Dysons are brilliant cleaners but, unfortunately, are somewhat fragile and unreliable.

My mate, who runs an independent audio/visual/appliances outlet, stopped selling them some time ago.

However, his workshop used to be quite busy repairing them for people from all over the area....:-)

You can buy bagless cylinder cleaners from around £25 but I can't remember where I saw the advertisement for them - it was a well known make.
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Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - L'escargot
I'm considering buying a bungalow having a garage plus workshop which has a pitched roof clad with "corrugated asbestos" which is on its last legs. (I've put it in parentheses because I've no doubt that it isn't the correct name). Does it come under the same banner as asbestos proper when it comes to removal, i.e. would it need to be removed by a specialist contractor?
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L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Stuartli
If it is asbestos, then it will need to be removed by a specialist, who will also have the /knowledge facilities to safely dispose of it.

Could be a bargaining point when negotiating a price for the property as well.
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Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Stuartli
..should read "knowledge/facilities"...
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Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - L'escargot
Could be a bargaining point when negotiating a price for the
property as well.


That's what I thought. The combined garage/workshop is 35 ft long by 10 ft wide and the roof is pitched, not flat. That's an awful lot of stuff to dispose of. I've told the estate agent that it really needs a complete tiled roof, which won't come cheap, and that I would be expecting this to be taken into consideration come price negotiation time. If I buy it, I would propose getting a builder to do the removal of the old roof as well as the adding of the new.

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L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - mare
I've told
the estate agent that it really needs a complete tiled roof,
which won't come cheap, and that I would be expecting this
to be taken into consideration come price negotiation time.


Just to be a complete PITA, as a heads up if you are proposing to change the roof from sheeting (asbestos or not) to tiled then:

You MAY need planning permission because you are changing the appearance - get a view from planning office.
If the bungalow is in a conservation area, then you MAY need their approval.
But mainly because you're changing from sheets to tiles (on felt and battens) which may well be heavier, you will need building regulations approval. And of course the practical matter of strengthening the structure. Changing sheets from one material to another of a similar mass will probably not affect the structure and therefore not fall within the regs.

And please don't think that one can just do things willy nilly without approvals. When you come to sell and are asked to declare what improvements you have done, you will of course explain what you have done and will be required by the conveyancer to produce evidence of building regs sign off.

All real and potentially relevant. The latter point about building control signoffs e.g. windows post April 2002, is one that solicitors are hot on. Down my way anyway.

Don't shoot the messenger!
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - martint123
It's normally called 'bonded asbestos' I think. Not at all like the flexible stuff that wraps heating pipes (which certainly does need correct handling).

If you enquire, you will be told that you need a specialist contractor - but only by contractors!. It is the same stuff as soffits and the like at a similar age are made of.

I pulled down my wood/asbestos garage a couple of years ago and called the local council who came and collected the asbestos for 15 quid (just chucked it on the back of a pickup.

If you do a google search for 'bonded asbestos' you will probably find your local councils site for its removal.

Martin
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - expat
It is very nasty stuff. It was made from a mixture of cement and asbestos fibres. Once it gets old it frays and the fibres come loose and can blow about. If it is in good condition, painted and not fraying it will be ok if it is left alone but don't try drilling or sanding it. If it is in poor condition as you say then you need to get a written quote from a specialist contractor to remove it and clean up. You also need to work out the cost of replacing it with something else. Be very careful here. You could be up for big money.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - nick
There are a lot of myths associated with corrugated asbestos. If you want some facts check out the Health and Safety Executive advice.
As previously stated, the sheets are a bonded mixture of cemement and asbestos. The asbestos content is around 10-15% of white asbestos, the least harmful type. You can handle and dispose of the stuff yourself. You do not need 'specialist' contractors who will charge you the earth. The HSE advice is to wear a normal nuisance dust mask and disposable overalls. The council will usually have a skip and a tip for asbestos, give them a ring. Either bag up the sheets or carry them on a pickup. Don't drill or break them if you can avoid it. A good idea is to hose them down with water before you start work.
My house had a roof like this when I bought it so I did a lot of homework before I handed over the cash. It's amazing how little knowledge mortgage companies, estate agents and even surveyors have regarding asbetos. They usually run a mile having lumped everything in will the old blue and brown lagging stuff which can be very dangerous.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Robert J.
That's good advice, Nick. Another thing to consider if you take the stuff to the tip yourself is that the council will only give you a licence for one trip per houshold, so make sure you take it all in one go (well, our Council does anyway)
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Cliff Pope
Nick is absolutely right. We had exactly that reply when we enquired about removing a decaying slate asbestos roof from a large property prior to restoration. No special qualifications or licence are required, just an ordinary duty of care.
Choose a damp day, or hose it down first.
The stuff is still available anyway - my local farmers suppliers do it in a variety of profiles.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Malcolm_L
My local council will take 'ordinary' asbestos roofing sheets, they do insist on sealed double bagging which isn't too much trouble.

Realistically, if you double bagged it, took it to the dump and disposed of it in the rubble skip it's higly unlikely that anyone would even question you.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - helicopter
I absolutely agree.You should bag it and stick in the local dump.

Far too much rubbish has been spouted on this issue and if some contractors had their way they would charge you for removing the Artex plaster on your ceiling.

Christopher Brooker in the Sunday Telegraph has written at length about the nonsensical EU directives which have been blindly accepted by our so called experts on the subject.

Takes calming down pill.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Stuartli
Perhaps some official local government guidelines are in order:

www.inverclyde.gov.uk/Community/index.php?module=a...5

www.environment-agency.gov.uk/netregs/processes/36...e

www.daventrydc.gov.uk/atoz/refuse/asbestosdisposal...l
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Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Civic8
Councils dont like it dumped in that manner.And with the amount of cameras they now have. Its more than possible they will catch up with you..Plus I dont recall any council allowing open sheets to be dumped in the locked/sealed skip. it must be DOUBLE bagged and sealed or they wont accept it.Untill it is..Our council and others around need a phone call before you take it.
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Steve
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - SlidingPillar
Check with your council - they vary. But I got the feeling that asking nicely as I did helped!

Bagging is a hazard when you have 6x3 sheets of the stuff, and mine would take it, without fee, but I had to make a specific appointment and put it in a special container. The gloves and overalls I wore were also disposed off the same way.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Thommo
Was up the Guildford Borough Council dump once and a worker spotted some of these corrogated sheets left propped against a skip. All hell broke loose with them trying to find out who left them, he then went off muttering something about needing to enter them in the 'hazardous wastes book'.

They were not happy so yes attitudes may vary council to council.

Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - expat
The new stuff is fibrous cement with the fibres being cellulose. Sawdust or similar I think. Anyway it has no asbestos in it. It is a very useful product. Cheap, lightweight, low maintenance. Ideal for sheds, etc.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Stargazer {P}
Expat,
Or houses, just think of all the 'fibro' houses in Australia.
Horrible stuff.

StarGazer
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - mfarrow
Personally I think the whole subject has been blown out of proportion. We had aspestos gutter pipe removed a few years ago and can't remember anything major needing doing. The first site Stuartli pointed to seems to paint it in the same light an anthrax.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Stuartli
Councils, like all employers, are required to observe all Health and Safety measures and precautions on behalf of their employees - it's not a product that is likely to be treated dismissively.
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Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - martint123
Our council will take away unbagged sheets for 15 quid a load. They also have a red skip at one of their dumps where you have to give name and address in their book and again, unbagged bonded asbestos goes in there - no limit to the number of trips etc.

York council seesm to have some excellent advice.

www.york.gov.uk/waste/asbestosdisp.html
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Civic8
>>Personally I think the whole subject has been blown out of proportion
I hate to disagree.But on this occasion I do.It is Lethal stuff. Asbestos dust is a large particle that the lung is not able to clear.And in the case of blue it grows in the lung.Similar to cancer but grows faster..ordinary asbestos dust ie white/grey aggravates the lungs causing ulcer type damage with bleeding.Which cannot be cured..Amounts mixed in with concrete make no differece it is still present..Which is why H&S say when breaking up protective clothing/gloves/mask must be worn.also it has to be kept wet while braking up.I stress not dry
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Steve
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - wemyss
Many different answers and it is imperative that you find the correct one for your particular location. It appears that different Councils view it differently which is surprising as they should all operate from H&S regultions.
My own experience working in Government Establishments is that we had to bring in specialist contracors to take it off the roof and they had to use skips with a sealed lid to remove from site.
However this was always the case regarding H&S due to the fact that they were Government Establishments and everything had to be done by the book.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Civic8
alvin.You are correct.I did a temp job for a heating co once..They put in a tender for a housing estate. ie new heating systems.It was specified any asbestos found on site.Had to be cleared by special contractors price included in tender..Installations were delayed by several weeks due to specialist removal team.I left before my company finished the contract..
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Steve
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Hugo {P}
There is a Health and Safety publication that has specific risk assessment and methods of work for many types of asbestos. I have a copy of it. I cannot find mine at the moment but from memory, it is regarded as perfectly safe to dismantle this structure yourself provided it has screwed fittings, not fittings that would have to be cut.

In practice, if you can get some bolt cutters to cut the bolts securing the asbestos sheets to the supports (timber frame) that may work. Essentially you should minimise damage to the sheets. They are not a hazard whilst they are kept whole.

Do NOT do any of the following:

Grind bolts off
Cut or grind sheet
Break sheets up deliberately
Deliberately damage sheets in any way

That is all I can advise without the book in front of me. However the HSE publication IIRC cost around £12 from them direct. I'm sure you'll be able to buy it from their site. I bought mine at a Cornwall County Council Health and Safety seminar.

PPE - Wear disposable coveralls, P3 breathing mask, gloves and eye protection whilst you're doing this.

Disposal - the advice given above is essentially correct.

Bag up any small bits in a sturdy heavy duty rubble bag, tape it up with duck tape and label it.

Large bits should be removed from site whole if at all possible. Go to the builders merchant and get a strong dust sheet or even an offcut of DPM for a tenner and use this to line your trailer or van that you remove it in. I would advise against using your car unless you're going to scrap it straight afterwards!

Throw out any wrapping along with the asbestos when you get to the tip. If they're anything like my tip, you'll need to tip it in a bonded skip. Tell the tip what you have when you get there.

Before you buy the house ask what facilities your council have for free domestic disposal.

H
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - nick
The HSE leaflet is available online, that's where I found it. Do a search and you'll find it easily enough. But you definitely do not need a specialist contractor, nor do you need to get dressed as a spaceman. Just use common sense and avoid unecessary exposure.
Councils and Govt. departments (speaks with 19 yrs govt. service)always go over the top on this as they are afraid of litigation if in 30 yrs time one of their ex-employees comes down with lung cancer and blames it on removing a roofing sheet or two. Plus they usually have Health and Safety officials who have to justify their existance.
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - Martin Devon
Many different answers and it is imperative that you find the
correct one for your particular location. It appears that different
Councils view it differently which is surprising as they should all
operate from H&S regultions.
My own experience working in Government Establishments is that we had
to bring in specialist contracors to take it off the roof
and they had to use skips with a sealed lid to
remove from site.
However this was always the case regarding H&S due to the
fact that they were Government Establishments and everything had to be
done by the book.

I could write a book on this and Council, (sorry, Local AUTHORITY), attitudes and the attitude(s) of their employees, but I am off for my Dinner now so there.

Cos i could get rid of it guvnor for a consideration!

Regards........Mask up or wet it down......who knows?
Garage with "corrugated asbestos" roof - wemyss
Hugo, The buildings I was concerned with were all larger ones. The asbestos sheet profiles were known as big six or super six. Little difference between them but they were incompatible with each other.
They were fixed down on to steel frame trusses timbered to accept fixings
Fixing of the sheets was done by fixing down through the high part of the profile. The fixings used were galvanised dome headed fixings and pretty sure they were nails and not screwed There was really no way of removing these from below.
The contractors who remove it come kitted up with a mobile trailer with showers. We have to provide a water and electric supply to it. They enter through a Perspex air lock to get suited up.
They emerge looking just like the Nassau spacemen heading for their Apollo space craft with suits and helmets.
We stand watching with awe and admiration as they climb up to pull a few sheets off. Clear their path back to their sealed skip of all convicts as if they were carrying an unexploded bomb. A little burst of cynical applause from ourselves and then its back through the airlock to disrobe and shower before they have a brew up.
On a more serious note though I do remember some years ago in a large closed prison of bagged blue asbestos being carried through the Centre which is the focal point of a closed prison below all the landings. A bag was dropped and burst open. The ventilation system was on and the dust would have circulated instantly throughout the establishment. Oaths and curses?brush and dustpan hurriedly applied, don?t panic Mr Mannering and back to normal???.I wasn?t there but can imagine the scene.


Ownership of propert boundaries - L'escargot
How do you know, with a reasonable degree of certainty, which of the side boundaries of your property you own? The vendors of a property I?m interested in say that the boundary on the left (as viewed from the road) belongs to the neighbour on the left. The neighbour on the left is of the same opinion ~ I found this out when I viewed their property, which was the first of the two to go on the market. However, I have obtained a copy of the title for the property I?m now interested in (from Land Register Online) and there is an entry which says ?A conveyance of the land in this title dated 4 January 1961 made between ?? (Vendor) and ??(Purchaser) contains the following provision: - The fence between the property hereby conveyed and the adjoining property on the West (i.e. on the left) shall belong to the property hereby conveyed.? The land was previously part of the property on the left but since then the owners of both properties have changed so neither can be asked for clarification. I don?t know the significance of the use of the word ?fence? and not ?boundary?. If I bought the property, as a matter of principle at the very least, I would just have to make the neighbour on the left aware that the boundary between the two properties was mine and not his.

I?m not at all sure that I want to buy a property that has a boundary dispute just waiting to happen. I know that some people would just inform the neighbour, and take the view that if the neighbour didn?t like it then this was the neighbour?s problem. Others would just say, ?Who cares who owns the boundary anyway?. However, I don?t come into either of those two categories. I like to exercise my rights, but with the minimum of aggro in the process. It can?t be nice to fall out with a neighbour the minute you move in.



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L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
Ownership of propert boundaries - mare
I?m not at all sure that I want to buy a
property that has a boundary dispute just waiting to happen.


Why not head it off at the pass then? If your proposed vendor and his current (and your proposed) neighbour both think the that the boundary belongs to the neighbour, meet them on site, give them both a copy of the conveyance and ask them for their views. They both may not appreciate that the boundary is with the property.

Get it sorted before you buy.

Personally i wouldn't worry whether or not a boundary is "mine" but more that everyone knows where the boundary is.
Ownership of propert boundaries - Cardew
I always considered that the 'owning' of a boundary simply means having the responsibility for maintenance of the fence between the two properties.

That said, this gives you the right to erect the type of fence you wish; as long as it complies with planning regulations.

If the current type of fence is not an issue, and the other property has taken on that responsibility, then there doesn't appear to be a problem.

I can understand why you wish to sort it out - in case he decides to erect an unsightly fence - but it shouldn't lead to a dispute.
Ownership of propert boundaries - Mapmaker
>>>- but it shouldn't lead to a dispute.

Shouldn't. But is bound too. I know every time I think 'I ought to cover myself, oh never mind, I cannot be bothered' it always ends in tears. My tears.

This will be an issue when the fence goes rotten, falls down & kills a valuable brain surgeon. Whose household insurance? Both insurance companies may try to refuse to cover it. If nothing else, who pays for the new fence?


Ownership of propert boundaries - Stuartli
About 20 years ago I acquired new neighbours (semi-detached Victorian property); the husband wished to put up a new fence between us ("I like my privacy") and almost demanded I paid half of the cost.

I politely told him where to go - against my wife's wishes as she wanted to be on friendly terms - and informed him that the small wooden party fence had to remain, with his new fence going up just inside it on his area of garden. I added I wasn't prepared to help to pay for his "privacy".

This was duly done, much to the resulting anger of my other half, who hadn't envisaged a 40ft plus long, six foot high concrete posts and wooden panels eyesore spoiling the view.

Two years ago the house changed hands again, this time being bought by a very pleasant couple. I took the precaution of advising them that the party fence had nothing to do with us and showed them the remains of the original fencing and footings. They accepted the fence was their responsibility.

Last winter we had some tremendous gales and, of course, most of the wooden panels were torn down or severely damaged. I'm just thankful I took the opportunity to inform the new owners that the fence was their property...:-)
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Ownership of propert boundaries - Robin
In the recent gales the fence between my house and the neighbour's came down. I checked on the deeds to see who was responsible: turns out it was shared. I went round to discuss fixing the fence and almost got into a row about who would pay as the neighbour insisted he would pay. He refused all offers to pay half each. Weird.
Ownership of propert boundaries - Stuartli
>>Weird>>

Or devious?
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What\'s for you won\'t pass you by
Ownership of propert boundaries - daveyjp
The fence between me and our neighbour collapsed slowly over a period of months until my efforts at keeping it upright failed and it almost fell on our car. My neighbour is a little excentric and doesn't live in the house much - it's her refuge for when she and her husband have a row and she leaves him!

Rather than get wound up about who was responsible I dropped her a note suggesting we split the cost as we both benefit from the fence. I also attached details of the type of fence I would be getting quotes for. We agreed and it was sorted out amicably.
Ownership of propert boundaries - L'escargot
I always considered that the 'owning' of a boundary simply means
having the responsibility for maintenance of the fence between the two
properties.
If the current type of fence is not an issue, and
the other property has taken on that responsibility, then there doesn't
appear to be a problem.
I can understand why you wish to sort it out -
in case he decides to erect an unsightly fence - but
it shouldn't lead to a dispute.


Unfortunately the fence referred to in the title document is no longer there. In its place are a variety of shrubs and (wait for it!) a 6 metre stretch of the dreaded ubiquitous leylandii, which I absolutely detest. At the moment it is reasonably under control, but the next owners may well just leave it to its own devices ~ after all, this is what most people do. This brings me back to the question of ownership of the boundary. Presumably the people next door planted the hedge on the assumption that they owned the boundary. If they were wrong in making this assumption, is the current or subsequent true owner of the boundary entitled to remove (or request removal of) this 20th century menace? In my view, whether one owns a boundary or not is of paramount importance.
--
L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
Ownership of propert boundaries - Altea Ego
Snail, do you have a really good reason to be interested in the property? A good enough reason to overcome all this potential hastle?
Ownership of propert boundaries - Stuartli
If you contact your local council they will provide you with details about Leylandii and disputes procedures.

Councils have/are about to get the power to encourage neighbours to settle amicably on the subject or, at a reasonable cost, will take action on behalf of the aggrieved party.

I'm waiting for my local council to confirm when it becomes applicable in order to sort out a neighbour's trees; one of them towers higher than my property and would crash down over at least two gardens if the worst happened.

Apart from that the loss of light and, in the case of the missus, lack of wind to blow her washing, are frustrating.
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What\'s for you won\'t pass you by
Ownership of propert boundaries - Cardew
Unfortunately the fence referred to in the title document is In its place are a variety of shrubs and
(wait for it!) a 6 metre stretch of the dreaded ubiquitous
leylandii, which I absolutely detest. At the moment it is reasonably
under control, but the next owners may well just leave it
to its own devices ~ after all, this is what most
people do. This brings me back to the question of ownership
of the boundary. Presumably the people next door planted the hedge
on the assumption that they owned the boundary. If they were
wrong in making this assumption, is the current or subsequent true
owner of the boundary entitled to remove (or request removal of)
this 20th century menace? In my view, whether one owns a
boundary or not is of paramount importance.
--
L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.


I did say "if the current type of fence is not an issue" and also "I can understand why you would wish to sort it out in case he erects an unsightly fence." So I haven't implied that the ownership wasn't important.

I agree leylandii are the number one cause of disputes between neighbours. Its a pity really because(IMO) kept low and well trimmed they can look quite nice. Of course as the boundary is yours you may trim them as you wish.

The danger there is nothing stopping anyone planting Leylandii just inside their border. Even the forthcoming legislation won't prevent that if they are kept low enough. There is a site on this called "hedgeline"
Ownership of propert boundaries - Hugo {P}
L'Escargot.

In answer to your original question, the deeds may have the details on them.

Our last house was a modern estate development. On the deeds each fence was marked with a little capital T. The boundary was owned by whoever had the T inside their garden.

This contradicted what my neighbours generally thought. When we were buying the house we asked them which fence was ours. They pointed to the one that was between them and us and said the fence between our other neigbour and us was not ours.

When we moved in I went around to speak to them and took copies of all the plans etc. The immediately agreed that they must have been mistaken. I ended up replacing the fence that was mine and shared the cost of the other one with the neigbour on the basis that he took on the maintenance from that point on. Up to that point they had been maintaining the fence the other side of the garden.

H
Ownership of propert boundaries - L'escargot
Our last house was a modern estate development. On the deeds
each fence was marked with a little capital T. The boundary
was owned by whoever had the T inside their garden.


The title documents of modern estate properties are probably quite precise as to what is what, but older one-off properties can be much more of a problem. For example, my current property is built on a plot of land which was originally part of the garden of an adjoining 1930's property. The plot was sold off in 1961, resold in 1991, and the building finally erected in 1997. On the "Enquiries before contract" document the previous owners, who were incidentally the builders (literally), said "not known" regarding the ownership of all three boundaries. I had to work it out myself by a combination of talking to the neighbours and putting two and two together. Hardly conclusive, though.
--
L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
Ownership of propert boundaries - Pugugly {P}
Anti Social Behaviour Act 2003 tries to put a stop to it.
Ownership of propert boundaries - Kevin
L'escargot,

some reading matter about boundary problems:

www.boundary-problems.co.uk/

Kevin...
Ownership of propert boundaries - L'escargot
L'escargot,
some reading matter about boundary problems:
www.boundary-problems.co.uk/
Kevin...


Thanks Kevin, I will study this ASAP.
--
L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
Margarita. Hotel recommendations. - daveyjp
As my wife hasn't been on a plane for about 6 weeks (!) she is getting itchy feet and want's to sort out this year's main holiday (the weekend in Northumberland and a week in Majorca don't count as proper holidays!). She is suggesting Margarita in the Carribbean at the end of the year. Anyone been who has suggestions for a good hotel preferably NOT all inclusive?
Margarita. Hotel recommendations. - 007
May I suggest you visit this site:

www.realholidayreports.com/
Transco break in - Soupytwist
Why would Transco (ex British Gas) want to break into someone's house? I had a knock at the door from a man claiming to be from Transco (he had a Transco van) asking if I knew where my next door neightbour was - they had a warrant to break in but wouldn't if there was likely to be any children at the property.

Was my neighbour being cut off ?
--
Matthew Kelly
No, not that one.
Transco break in - Ex-Moderator
A leak, perhaps.
Transco break in - mare
Gas leak probably. Transco have authority to enter premises and disconnect equipment that is leaking gas.

Needless to say, you would be less than amused if they didn't enter and the house went BOOOOOMMMM!!!!

Not entering with children in the house is now sadly common and necessary to avoid vexatious claims of abuse. Estate and letting agents have a similar policy of not entering property where they are children but no adults.
Transco break in - Soupytwist
I had wondered about the possibility of a leak, so asked the bloke at the door whether it was anything I needed to be worried about.

He said not but then telling me that my next door neighbour's house was likely to blow up in a matter of minutes probably wouldn't have reassured me!
--
Matthew Kelly
No, not that one.
Transco break in - Bromptonaut
Recall a Richard Stillgoe skit on Nationwide (showing my age) about all the bodies that had a statutory right of entry to one's home. The gas board was up there along with water and electric and a cast of tens.

As the statutory undertaking functions went to Transco on break up of BG then no doubt they inherited the power of entry.

Either a cut off or emergency access to pipework, but the worry about kids suggests a disconection!!
Transco break in - Altea Ego
He is there to cut them off. Reason he asked about children is that he cant (under child protection act) cut the gas if there are kids living there.
Transco break in - Pugugly {P}
"he cant (under child protection act) cut the gas if there are kids living there."

They can but a code of practice ensures that they liaise with the local Social Services beforehand if there are kids there. The Mags would usually ask the person applying for the warrant about kids and that before they took the warrant out. In the old days they used to take the Old Bill with them, they still do in cases where there is liekly to be trouble...
Transco break in - Soupytwist
Well, they were back yesterday while my neighbour was in. Perhaps he's coughed up what he may have owed them.
--
Matthew Kelly
No, not that one.
Transco break in - Stuartli
My next door neighbour suffers from a similar syndrome (i.e. refusal to pay bills unless a heavy hand drops on his shoulder).

The last time the power company came to cut off his gas supply by virtue of a warrant issued at court, the representatives had a police officer with them.

The "break-in" was neat and tidy and with no damage, thanks to a very efficient locksmith.
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What\'s for you won\'t pass you by
Transco break in - Soupytwist
The "break-in" was neat and tidy and with no damage, thanks to a very efficient locksmith.


Same here, from what I could tell, having a crafty look from the end of his drive.
--
Matthew Kelly
No, not that one.
Charging small battery - wemyss
I changed the battery on the burglar alarm system the other day. It?s a 2.Ah sealed lead acid type.
When in use its constantly charged by a trickle charger within the control panel.
Still in reasonable condition and I could use it in my garage as a 12V tester etc.
My question is whether I could charge it with my normal 12V car battery charger.
As these put out about 3.5A I wouldn?t like to risk it if there is any danger etc.

Charging small battery - Altea Ego
I wouldnt, you will boil it, and as its sealed it will explode.

They are not the same as car batteries, they have a electrolyte gel inside, not acid.
Charging small battery - spikeyhead {p}
It depends on the charger.

Most cheap ones are constant voltage chargers, which put out a constant voltage and the internal resistance of the battery limits the current. Big posh ones are used to push a constant current into the battery for fast charging, that is then reduced to a trickle once the battery is deemed charged.

So if you've got a cheap charger then you're unlikely to have a problem, but if its an expensive posh one then you may have.
--
I read often, only post occasionally
Charging small battery - wemyss
Thanks for that. I do have both a posh one (Accumate) and a 40 year old ordinary type.
But probably not worth taking a chance so will give it a miss.
Charging small battery - defender
one way to charge a battery like this is to connect it pos to pos neg to neg with a second larger battery and put the charger on to the larger one.
Tax return woe - Soupytwist
Two questions on the same IHAQ thread - I am getting my money's worth !

I have received a Late Tax Return penalty notice sayin that I have not completed & submitted my tax return for year ending April 2004. Indeed I did not submit a tax return for that year as I was not aware of the requirement to do so - I had no previous communication from the Inland Revenue about it prior to receiving the penalty notice - no self assesment form, nothing. I'm going to appeal - has anyone else been in this boat before and what are my chances.
I'm employed on a PAYE basis by a large company and have a cxouple of things that attract BIK liablities.
--
Matthew Kelly
No, not that one.
Tax return woe - frostbite
Perhaps I have been lucky but I have always found the IR to be staffed by helpful people and I would hope that if you contact them, you may well find the same.

On the basis of what you say, it may just be an error.
Tax return woe - hxj

Sorry but you won't have been put on the SA system just to receive a penalty notice. The IR computer believes that it sent out a return and it has not been sent back either 'undelivered' or signed by you. And the relevant IR computer is pretty reliable.

Are you really sure that you didn't receive a polythene wrapped package at the begining of April, may be filed it like everyone else does at the bottom of the 'to do tray'.

My advice - ring your tax office tomorrow, the number should be on the penalty notice, explain the position and ask them to send a new return out. Fill it in as soon as you get it, take it if you can to a tax enquiry centre and get a receipt. Hand in a letter appealing against the penalty on the grounds that you received no notice to make a return. They may be nice and agree with you.

If of course you have any untaxed income, not dealt with through the PAYE system, or gains then of course you have an obligation to notify them of your liability. In which case they are unlikely to be kind, because you clearly also forgot to do that ....
Tax return woe - Soupytwist
"Are you really sure that you didn't receive a polythene wrapped package at the begining of April" - absolutely certain that I did not receive such a pack.

I've appealed against the fine, using the form they provide, with a letter asking that they send me the relevant paperwork ASAP so that I can complete and return it.

"If of course you have any untaxed income, not dealt with through the PAYE system" - does the interest from my rather paltry ISA, ING Direct & Credit Union savings fall into this bracket ?
--
Matthew Kelly
No, not that one.
Tax return woe - hxj
"Are you really sure that you didn't receive a polythene wrapped
package at the begining of April" - absolutely certain that I
did not receive such a pack.


Make sure you look out for one in month or so for the current year ...
I've appealed against the fine, using the form they provide, with
a letter asking that they send me the relevant paperwork ASAP
so that I can complete and return it.


No problem at all with that. The quicker that you send it in after receipt the more likely they are to believe your explanation.
"If of course you have any untaxed income, not dealt with
through the PAYE system" - does the interest from my rather
paltry ISA, ING Direct & Credit Union savings fall into this
bracket ?


The ISA no. The others paid net will have an impact if you pay higher rate tax.

The penalty cannot exceed the tax due, so hope there is an over deduction under PAYE!

--
Matthew Kelly
No, not that one.


May be they got the right name but the wrong person
Tax return woe - mfarrow
Just a guess, but was it about the time of the postal strikes last year that they were sent out?

A friend of mine who lives in Oxford had two letters go missing shortly after the strikes finished after posting them in the same post box. Both were going to different areas. Coincidence?
Washing Powder - frostbite
Might be testing the BR limits with this one.

I have an allergic reaction to washing powders and freshly washed clothes that are drying/being ironed.

Does anyone know if the (fairly universal across the brands) smell is an unavoidable by-product of the base component, or can an odourless product be obtained?
Washing Powder - mjm
According to the boss, try "Dreft", or "Lux" flakes, they are a "pure" product with no added "smelly" compounds. I am afraid that I only get the clothes dirty, but the boss has been doing the reverse for the family for 30+ years.
Washing Powder - henry k
According to the boss, try "Dreft", or "Lux" flakes, they are
a "pure" product with no added "smelly" compounds. .

>>
I have always understood these were the traditional products
Try
tinyurl.com/6x7oe
I have no idea about the company but at least one of the products looks promising.
Washing Powder - malteser
IIRC Amway do a detergent which is pretty good and contains no enzymes
--
Roger. (Costa del Sol, España)
Washing Powder - nick
Try Ecover products.
Washing Powder - frostbite
Thanks for all the suggestions chaps - will have to experiment there, although some look somewhat pricey.
13 amp socket mounted on partition wall - L'escargot
What is the best technique for flush mounting a 13-amp socket on a partition wall? Are there socket boxes made specifically for this purpose? (It must be a common problem in modern properties.) I realise that a surface mounted socket would be easier but it would not look as good.

I assume that the wall is made from plasterboard sheets on a wooden framework rather than being pre-constructed panels ~ it is the front wall of an integral wardrobe/cupboard. I propose routing the wiring through the wall into the wardrobe and then upwards through the ceiling to a conveniently nearby junction box in the ring main in the loft space.

I?ve downloaded a copy of The Building Regulations 2000 Approved Document P and it doesn?t seem to be anywhere near as daunting/restrictive to the diy electrician as some people would have you believe. The following is an extract from said document.

?Table 1: Work that need not be notified to building control bodies
Work consisting of:
Replacing any electrical fitting including socket-outlets, control switches and ceiling roses
Replacing the cable for a single circuit only, where damaged, for example, by fire, rodent or impact (a)
Re-fixing or replacing the enclosures of existing installation components (b)
Providing mechanical protection to existing fixed installations (c)
Work that is not in a kitchen or special location and does not involve a special installation (d) and consists of:
Adding lighting points (light fittings and switches) to an existing circuit (e)
Adding socket-outlets and fused spurs to an existing ring or radial circuit (e)
Installing or upgrading main or supplementary equipotential bonding (f)
Work not in a special location on:
Telephone or extra-low voltage wiring and equipment for the purposes of communications, information technology, signalling, control
and similar purposes
Notes
(a) On condition that the replacement cable has the same current carrying capacity, follows the same route and does not serve
more than one sub-circuit through a distribution board.
(b) If the circuit?s protective measures are unaffected.
(c) If the circuit?s protective measures and current-carrying capacity of conductors are unaffected by increased thermal insulation.
(d) Special locations and installations are listed in Table 2.
(e) Only if the existing circuit protective device is suitable and provides protection for the modified circuit, and other relevant safety
provisions are satisfactory.
(f) Such work shall comply with other applicable legislation, such as the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations.
3 BS 7671: 2001 Appendix 6

Electrical safety Approved Document P
9
P ELECTRICAL SAFETY
Table 2: Special locations and installations (a)
Special locations:
Locations containing a bath tub or shower basin
Swimming pools or paddling pools
Hot air saunas
Special installations:
Electric floor or ceiling heating systems
Garden lighting or power installations
Solar photovoltaic (PV) power supply systems
Small scale generators such as microCHP units
Extra-low voltage lighting installations, other than pre-assembled, CE-marked lighting sets
Notes
(a) See IEE Guidance Note 7 which gives more guidance on achieving safe installations where risks to people are greater.?


--
L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
13 amp socket mounted on partition wall - wemyss
This link on how to fix it,
tinyurl.com/5j4pm

And this on the type of box you need.
tinyurl.com/3n4lo

As regarding where you make a connection, any existing junction boxes in the roof space are likely to be off the lighting circuit and not the ring main which you are probably aware of.
Normally you would take the spur off an existing socket outlet and you are allowed to fit one only from any of these unless you use a fused connection unit.


13 amp socket mounted on partition wall - L'escargot
Thanks alvin.

The junction box is definitely in a power circuit because it goes dead (tested using a multimeter) when I switch off the only trip/switch marked "sockets" in the consumer unit. I assume that it will be a ring main because the property is only 8 years old ~ the trip/switch is marked RCBO LN6330s 32A 30mA Type 2. However, the junction box has three cables (each TC and E) connected in it so I assume that one of them is already a spur. In that case, can I connect another spur at that point? It will only be used for a bedside clock.
--
L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
13 amp socket mounted on partition wall - Altea Ego
ONly used for a bedside clock? Maybe but how long before Mrs snail comes along and plugs in a 1000 watt hoover? or the iron?

All 13 amp sockets have to be cabled in compliant with the regs and able to provide the maximum current designed.
13 amp socket mounted on partition wall - L'escargot
ONly used for a bedside clock? Maybe but how long before
Mrs snail comes along and plugs in a 1000 watt hoover?
or the iron?
All 13 amp sockets have to be cabled in compliant with
the regs and able to provide the maximum current designed.


Fair comment.

To illustrate that I have a reasonable degree of competence, the socket will be wired using 2.5 sq.mm TC and E cable with the exposed ends of the earth wire covered with yellow/green sleeving. I have the cable already and the insulation colour is to the latest standard of brown and blue, rather than the earlier standard of black and red.

The question really is whether there is any reason why I shouldn't connect a spur into a ring main at a junction box which already has a spur?
--
L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
13 amp socket mounted on partition wall - L'escargot
<< I have the cable already and the insulation colour is
to the latest standard of brown and blue, rather than the
earlier standard of black and red.


Correction :- I have the cable already and the insulation colour is to the latest standard of brown and blue, rather than the earlier standard of red and black.

--
L\'escargot by name, but not by nature.
13 amp socket mounted on partition wall - John24
As I understood it, you could take as many spurs as you wanted from a ring main, but you couldn't take a spur from a spur. However, I may have been overtaken by more recent legislation!
13 amp socket mounted on partition wall - wemyss
I should fit a new 30A junction box alongside the existing if required, to the existing ring main. This would avoid taking a spur from a spur.
Our sparkies when doing this always used to avoid cutting the ring main but cut the insulation away instead, removing the junction box screws and then laying the bare conductors into the slots using the centre one as the earth.
Then adding the new 2.5 tails on these same connections.
Much easier to make all these connections before screwing the junction box to the side of the timber.
13 amp socket mounted on partition wall - Hugo {P}
Alvin

Quite agree if you don't have a suitable socket nearby. This saves a break in the circuit that could become a loose connection one day.

However, if the slug (easier to spell the L'escargot and snail;) ) has a nearby ring main socket then it maybe just as easy to use that.

RF, whilst you're correct in principle about the wiring regs IIRC we're still allowed to use the red and black cable for a while yet, to allow stocks to dwindle.

H
 

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