Review: KIA Pro_cee'd (2013 – 2018)

Rating:

Good-looking and well equipped as standard. GT model is sufficiently sporty to feel fun while 1.6-litre diesel engine is swift and frugal.

Long doors aren't ideal in narrow spaces. The Pro_Cee’d has the looks but is not a sporty drive unless you opt for the GT.

Recently Added To This Review

1 September 2016 Upgraded Kia Cee'd goes on sale

The improvements include Kia’s all-new three-cylinder 1.0-litre T-GDI engine, as well as a range of new safety, comfort and convenience upgrades. The upgraded model will come with a new ‘GT... Read more

4 April 2014 Pro_Cee'd SE Tech added to range

Powered by 1.6-litre 126bhp CRDi turbodiesel engine and six-speed manual gearbox, and is priced at £22,795. It has identical insurance, economy and performance figures to the SE fitted with the... Read more

9 January 2014

SR7 versions of Kia Cee'd announced Every SR7 has a higher specification than the 2014 VR7 special-edition models. LED daytime running lights, cornering lights, front foglights, automatic headlight... Read more

KIA Pro_cee'd (2013 – 2018): At A Glance

The Kia Pro_Cee’d avoids being just a three-door version of the Cee’d hatch by virtue of its more coupe-like roof line. It’s a handsome car that adds a sporting tone to Kia’s mid-size car, with the performance to back it up in GT guise.

Opting for the Pro_Cee’d over the Cee’d means losing some of the five-door’s practicality, though access to the back seats is reasonable thanks to the long doors. You can also fit a couple of adults in there, though they may feel a little hemmed in due to the high window line.

There’s no arguing about the space, quality and amount of standard equipment for those in the front of the Pro_Cee’d, though. All models come with air conditioning, cruise control, Bluetooth, rear parking sensors and steering wheel controls for the stereo.

You can choose from S, SE, SE Tech and SR7 trim levels, with the last one offering the lowest entry price. This means the Kia Pro_Cee’d is very competitively priced against the likes of the Alfa Romeo Mito and Vauxhall Astra GTC.

There are also alloy wheels for every Pro_Cee’d model to follow through on the sporty intent of this model. In the 1.4- and 1.6-litre petrol and 1.6 diesel models, economy and emissions are on a par with most in the class, but don’t expect much in the way of excitement.

For more verve, you need to look to the Pro_Cee’d GT, which has a 201PS turbocharged 1.6-litre petrol engine. While it’s almost as powerful as a Volkswagen Golf GTI, the Kia is very much a warm hatch rather than hot one, so 0-62mph in 7.7 seconds is nippy rather than swift. Still, it’s good to drive, well kitted out and cheaper to buy than faster hot hatches.

Kia Pro_Cee'd Range 2013 Road Test

Kia Pro_Cee'd 1.6 GT 2012 Road Test

Kia Pro_Cee'd 1.6GT 2015 Road Test

Kia Pro_Cee'd 1.0 T-GDI GT Line 2016 Road Test 

What does a KIA Pro_cee'd (2013 – 2018) cost?

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KIA Pro_cee'd (2013 – 2018): What's It Like Inside?

Dimensions
Length 4310 mm
Width 1780 mm
Height 1425–1470 mm
Wheelbase 2650 mm

Full specifications

Anyone choosing the Pro_Cee’d over its five-door Cee’d hatch sister will be aware the three-door model sacrifices some practicality in favour of style and coupe looks.

It’s a trade worth making if you don’t need the extra seat of doors to ease entry and exit to the rear seats as the Pro_Cee’d is a good looking car. Even more relevant, it also retains the ability to seat two adults in complete comfort in the rear seats.

While there’s plenty of space in the rear bench for two adults, access is more of a problem. The long doors open wide, which helps ease entry and exit but makes tightly packed car parks a challenge. Also, the front seats slide forward but it’s still a yoga-like process to get in and out, though not any different from other cars of this ilk. Further back still, the boot has quite a high floor but can accommodate up to 380 litres of luggage.

Move to the front seats and the Pro_Cee’d offers very much the same fine driving position and comfort as the Cee’d hatch. The steering wheel adjusts for height and reach, while the driver’s seat can also be moved for height to help achieve the ideal seating position.

Ahead of the driver is a central speedo with rev counter on one side and fuel gauge on the other. A digital on-board computer tells the driver of other functions, while steering wheel controls allow the driver to operate the stereo, cruise control and a mobile phone while maintaining steering control.

In the centre console, Kia offers two options for the display screen. Lower spec models have a smaller screen, while the upper scale models have a 7-inch touchscreen display for the stereo, phone and navigation. The GT model has a standalone specification that includes the touchscreen for Tech versions.

All GT models come with Recaro front sports seats with part-leather upholstery and red stitching. They also have a speedo that can be switched into a sport mode should the driver feel the need for the dash to match his mood.

As well as the GT and GT Tech models, the Pro_Cee’d comes in S, SE, SE Tech and SR7 trims. The SR7 is the entry point and includes air conditioning, Bluetooth, USB and auxiliary ports, heated door mirrors and cornering lights to help the driver see round bends more readily. There are also rear parking sensors to help counter the thick rear pillars and high boot line.

The S model adds Kia’s FlexSteer system that lets the driver choose between three modes for the steering feel. This model comes with rear privacy glass too. Move to the SE and you gain a reversing camera, keyless entry and ignition, voice recognition and an auto-dimming rear view mirror. With the SE Tech, you get a tilt and slide sunroof, black leather upholstery, heated steering wheel and electric parking brake.

Child seats that fit a KIA Pro_cee'd (2013 – 2018)

Our unique Car Seat Chooser shows you which child car seats will fit this car and which seat positions that they will fit, so that you don't have to check every car seat manufacturer's website for compatibility.

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What's the KIA Pro_cee'd (2013 – 2018) like to drive?

Expectations of how the Pro_Cee’d will drive are raised compared to its five-door hatch sister model as the Pro_Cee’d has some sporting connotations due to its coupe style. Approach the car with this mindset and you will be disappointed unless you choose the GT model.

In all but the GT version, the Pro_Cee’d is set up much more for comfort and long distance refinement than short bursts of enthusiastic driving. While this may come as a let-down for some, it’s good news for the majority of people as it means the Pro_Cee’d is good at getting from here to there without putting a strain on its occupants.

The ride is more than able to deal with the UK’s broken road surfaces and enjoys a well padded comfort. Coupled to decent refinement and insulation from wind and road noise, the Pro_Cee’d covers ground in a calm and composed way.

For the keener driver, however, this means the Pro_Cee’d does not offer the handling precision or fun of a Volkswagen Scirocco or Vauxhall Astra GTC, both of which lean much less in corners, feel more planted and have significantly better steering feel.

It’s the feel of the steering that really lets down the Pro_Cee’d. In the straight ahead, there is little sensation of what the front wheels are up to. Move the steering slightly off-centre, as you would perhaps when changing lane on the motorway and the same shortage of connection between the driver’s hands and the front wheels remains.

All Pro_Cee’ds other than the SR7 come with Kia’s FlexSteer system, which lets the driver choose from three different steering modes. In Sport setting, the steering is just heavier rather than offering any more sensitivity to the driver.

Try the Pro_Cee’d GT and things are markedly better. While the steering in the GT is not has full of feel as a Volkswagen Golf GTI’s, it’s much more accurate than the other models in the Pro_Cee’d range to work with the driver on a twisty road.

The GT’s 1.6-litre turbo engine has a briskness to it that gives it just enough performance to be fun. It needs to be revved to get the best from it, but it’s not raucous when driven like this.

Other petrol engines in the Pro_Cee’d work well, though the 1.4-litre unit needs to be worked hard to get the best from it. Much better is the 1.6-litre turbodiesel with 260Nm of shove to make it feel surprisingly brisk

Engine MPG 0-62 CO2
1.0T GDI 118 58 mpg 10.7 s 115 g/km
1.0T GDI 98 58 mpg 12.4 s 113 g/km
1.4 46–47 mpg 12.3–12.4 s 138–143 g/km
1.6 CRDi 66–74 mpg 9.5–11.5 s 99–112 g/km
1.6 CRDi DCT 67–72 mpg 10.2 s 103–109 g/km
1.6 GDI 47–52 mpg 9.5–9.8 s 124–137 g/km
1.6 GDI DCT 46 mpg 10.4 s 140 g/km
1.6T GDI 38 mpg 7.3–7.4 s 170–171 g/km

Real MPG average for a KIA Pro_cee'd (2013 – 2018)

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

77%

Real MPG

25–61 mpg

MPGs submitted

79

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

What have we been asked about the KIA Pro_cee'd (2013 – 2018)?

Every day we're asked hundreds of questions from car buyers and owners through Ask Honest John. Our team of experts, including the nation's favourite motoring agony uncle - Honest John himself - answer queries and conudrums ranging from what car to buy to how to care for it as an owner. If you could do with a spot of friendly advice before buying you're next car, get in touch and we'll do what we can to help.

Ask HJ

My car is tax exempt but I was clamped and charged for being untaxed - is there anything I can do?

I own a 2014 Kia Pro_cee'd Eco which is exempt from car tax. On 24 November 2016 my car was clamped for being untaxed and I had to pay £230 (£130 later reimbursed) to have it removed. I wrote to the DVLA who told me that despite it being exempt it still needs to be 'taxed' and I have no recourse. To add insult to injury I now have to pay £30 to avoid court action. So-called exemption has cost me £130 - is there anything I can do?
No. You have to re-tax the car every year even though there is no charge for the tax. You will have received a notice from the DVLA to that effect.
Answered by Honest John
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