Audi A6 (2004 – 2011) Review

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Audi A6 (2004 – 2011) At A Glance

High quality and refined cabin. Good engines including frugal TDI diesels. Maximum five-star crash test rating. Classy image.

Earlier 2.0 TDI PD engine not especially refined and had some problems. Originally shown as a 4 seater and rear seat not very roomy.

Insurance Groups are between 25–38
On average it achieves 90% of the official MPG figure

The Audi A6 of 2004 is a very good looking, refined and comfortable cruiser with a high-class cabin and was one of the best all-round executive saloons available. It may not have the most daring design, but the understated looks are part of the appeal and echo the classy image of the car. Inside it's very impressive with an easy to use but upmarket cabin that is well finished with a durable and hardwearing feel.

It's no surprise that comfort and refinement are the overriding features that truly stand out. On the road the A6 doesn't quite deliver the same level of driver involvement as a BMW 5 Series, but it's still keen enough in corners with good roadholding and a forgiving ride, only the rather artifical steering lets it down. But on the motorway the A6 effortlessly cruises along with minimal noise levels.

There's a good choice of engines in the range too, from the frugal 2.0 TDIe that averages 53.3mpg to a wonderful 3.0T FSI with 290bhp. The Audi A6 is really at its best with the larger engines and an automatic gearbox, allowing you to enjoy its relaxed nature and comfort.

In 2008 the Audi A6 was significantly revised with a new exterior - most notable at the back where there are fresh LED tail lights - while new engines were introduced too, making it an even better car all round.

Looking for a Audi A6 (2004 - 2011)?
Register your interest for later or request to be contacted by a dealer to talk through your options now.

Real MPG average for a Audi A6 (2004 – 2011)

Real MPG was created following thousands of readers telling us that their cars could not match the official figures.

Real MPG gives real world data from drivers like you to show how much fuel a vehicle really uses.

Average performance

90%

Real MPG

23–55 mpg

MPGs submitted

246

Diesel or petrol? If you're unsure whether to go for a petrol or diesel (or even an electric model if it's available), then you need our Petrol or Diesel? calculator. It does the maths on petrols, diesels and electric cars to show which is best suited to you.

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Ask Honest John

What's the best big engined car for £3000?
"I have a small budget of about £3000 and I see I can afford old Chrslyer 300C, old Audi A8 or A6, old BMW 7 Series and a big Lexus. I like big engined cars, so which do you think ages better and will possibly cost less in the long run? In summary, best stupid car for £3000."
Honestly? They could all cost a fortune to keep on the road. An old Lexus is probably your best option but even then you'll need deep pockets for maintenance and fuel costs.
Answered by Andrew Brady
Can I disable my car's headlamp washer jets?
"My 2012 Audi A6 is using a lot of screen wash fluid. It has headlamp washers which I suspect are the culprits. Is it feasible (and legal) to disable them?"
The headlamp washer jets are a testable item under the MoT. It will result in a Minor fault if it has halogen headlights or a Major fault (and fail) if it has LED or gas discharge systems (HID).
Answered by Dan Powell
My car broke down because of too much oil in the engine - can this be fixed?
"I have an Audi A6 2008 and last week on the way to having a service, the car blew loads of blue smoke out of the exhaust. It was towed back to my address and I had a mechanic come out look at it - they said there was too much oil in the engine. He drained a gallon out and got it started but he says it needs to be taken apart and the system flushed out. Apparently the engine is not damaged. I have asked him for an approx price to do this but he insists he can't tell me. I live in Tilbrook, a tiny village near Kimbolton and desperately need the car fixed. Can you offer any advice or an approximate price that you think as a ball park figure. I am disabled, on my own and have no family and I lost my son recently."
I'm very sorry for your situation. It reads to me as if you have been switching off the engine while the DPF was actively regenerating using post-injected diesel. Instead of being burned in the DPF some of the post injected diesel has sunk into the engine oil sump, contaminating the engine oil and raising its level. Once it gets past a certain point, being a compression ignition engine, the engine can run uncontrollably on the oil/diesel mixture in the sump. But if the engine starts, then a proper oil service (possibly including removal of the sump to get rid of all the contaminated oil) should sort it out. This shows you local servicing garages, including Hofmans of Bicton: https://good-garage-guide.honestjohn.co.uk/directory/search?postcode=&region=East+of+England&service=Servicing / I think the mechanic is being honestly cautious about giving you a price because he is not sure of what damage occurred and the same would probably be true of any garage.
Answered by Honest John
What is my legal position on a new timing belt failure?
"9 months ago I had a new timing belt fitted on my 2009 Audi A6, 108,000 miles (the second belt I've had fitted). The bolt securing the timing belt tensioner failed and snapped off as confirmed by an Audi dealer. I have contacted the garage who fitted the belt and the car will taken to them for "evaluation". I know it's likely that the engine has been severely damaged as a result. Given that they fitted a timing belt kit where does liability lie in this situation? Is there any standard warranty on car parts? How should I best handle the situation with the garage? I simply cannot afford a new car or engine. What is my legal position here so I can negotiate with them?"
It's an 8 year old high mileage car. I don't think you can hold the service garage liable for the snapping of an 8 year old bolt. But you could take it for arbitration to https://www.themotorombudsman.org/
Answered by Honest John

What does a Audi A6 (2004 – 2011) cost?

Buy new from £33,710 (list price from £42,130)
Contract hire from £330.00 per month