FIAT Panda (2003 - ) - Multijet diesel  
Multijet diesel - Corrib12
Has anyone done a significant mileage yet in the Fiat Panda 1.3 Multijet diesel? HJ raves about it and that's always a good sign. What about noise levels? Load space? Is Fiat build quality up with the best these days? It may be a bit on the small side for me, but I'm tempted by 70+mpg on the open road.

Tags: technical issues new cars small cars fuel economy

Multijet diesel - barchettaman
Have you driven it yet, Corrib?
Multijet diesel - Honestjohn
Don't reckon on 70+. High 50s, maybe.

HJ
Multijet diesel - madf
I test drove one. VERY noisy when idling cold....Put me right off it.
madf
Multijet diesel - paulb {P}
Mrs B has one, in Dynamic spec with the a/c pack (£500). Yep, when it's cold it's a noisy old thing all right and a bit lag-prone, but once warm it's fine. Engine is smooth enough (seems to run best on BP Ultimate) and we have no complaints with the performance at all. Doesn't feel underpowered on motorways; we had a 1.2 petrol version before this one and that did. Brakes (vented front discs, rear drums and ABS) are very good, which in days past was not something you could generally say about small Fiats.

Consumption on long trips is about 58 mpg; in daily use (including urban) about 51 mpg. This is with the a/c on all the time. Stupid-cheap to tax (£35) and insure (this year was under £200, including business use for both her and me).

Build quality is very good - no bone-headed faults, no creaks, rattles or bits dropping off. In my experience, Polish-built Fiats do seem rather better screwed together.

Reliability has thus far been faultless. We picked it up new on 1 August 06; the first time it went back to the dealer for anything was on 1 August 07 for its first service. All it needed in the meantime was diesel, screenwash, occasional air in tyres and the odd wash. Haven't had many cars that have been this well-behaved. It hasn't used a drop of oil, either, which in my experience of running in diesels is most unusual.
Multijet diesel - burpie
Do small Fiats still have clutch cables which snap all the time?
Multijet diesel - Collos25
no
Multijet diesel - dan86

Ther all hydraulic now not many if any new cars have clutch cables now.

Multijet diesel - gmac
Do small Fiats still have clutch cables which snap all the time?

I didn't realise they did snap all the time.
I've had five FIATs, all done six figure mileages and the only clutch cable which did snap was on a seven year old 120,000 mile 127 GT.
Not what I'd class as a common problem.
Multijet diesel - madf
I decided on a yaris diesle: 55mpg around town 61-5 on long journeys, less noise and better built. More expensive tho.
madf
Multijet diesel - Collos25
Better build quality I doubt that made very near to each other.
Multijet diesel - boxsterboy
Yaris is built ion east France. Aygo built in Czech Republic (near to Poland, I suppose).
Multijet diesel - Collos25
Not far away compared to Japan ,French or Czech workers much the same.
Multijet diesel - Collos25
Actually the fiat is made in Tychy Poland.
Multijet diesel - paulj56

I decided on a yaris diesle: 55mpg around town 61-5 on long journeys, less noise and better built. More expensive tho. madf

Best of luck you will need it, our toyota lease cars have been crap the yaris has broken down 5 times and the 2 rav 4s have had 3 new engines between them, not to mention one side of the dasbourd of the yaris falling off, there interiors are cheap crappy plastic, i have to laugh because my panda m/jet is closing in on 90000 miles had a clutch changed under warranty, a stop light bulb and a set of new discs, toyota 5 year warranty they need it.

Multijet diesel - P3t3r
>> Do small Fiats still have clutch cables which snap all the time?
>>
I didn't realise they did snap all the time.


They are pretty bad on Cinquecento's and Seicento's, others might be OK though. My one took around 6-7 years to snap though.
Multijet diesel - doctorchris
New Panda has a hydraulic clutch and the best reliability and build quality in the Fiat range.
Multijet diesel - Xileno {P}
"...and the best reliability and build quality in the Fiat range"

Just as well... ;-)

Joking aside, the Panda does appear to be Fiat's 'turnaround' car. One of the surveys put it at about number 8 I think. If they can keep up the good work then things should be much brighter for the company. Fiat 500 looks good.
Multijet diesel - madf
You are all wrong (of course!:-).. on Yaris sourcing.

I believe all diesels are Made in Japan. Mine certainly was.

Or someone just put lots of Japanese stickers on to confuse the unwary...:-)
madf
Multijet diesel - Pandaman
Yes all the diesels were imported from Japan. I had one a great car but expensive.
The Panda is much less refined but a lot more fun to drive.
I have a 1.2 and not one thing has gone wrong in the year Ive owned it, Id say build quality is up with the best plus it only costs £5K + brand new. How much is a new Yaris diesel with aircon, how about twice as much!!!
Multijet diesel - AlanGowdy
My FIAT Grande Punto also has the Multijet diesel and so far (in its first 5,000 miles) it has been operationally faultless and the finish and build quality - inside and out - seem equally impressive. Perhaps FIAT quality is on the up at long last... I do hope I'm not tempting fate by suggesting this!

Incidentally FIATs certainly did have fragile clutch cables. Years ago I owned a 128 that snapped the cable at 15,000 miles. The offending part looked about as sturdy as the sort of thing you'd find on a lightweight motorcycle. It put me off the make for a long time.
Multijet diesel - paulj56
My FIAT Grande Punto also has the Multijet diesel and so far (in its first 5,000 miles) it has been operationally faultless and the finish and build quality - inside and out - seem equally impressive. Perhaps FIAT quality is on the up at long last... I do hope I'm not tempting fate by suggesting this! Incidentally FIATs certainly did have fragile clutch cables. Years ago I owned a 128 that snapped the cable at 15,000 miles. The offending part looked about as sturdy as the sort of thing you'd find on a lightweight motorcycle. It put me off the make for a long time. On the up so you clearly havent had the likes of fiestas and novas and corsas, Fiat have always built good honest cars, and fun to drive,

Multijet diesel - joe9109
Hi I have done about 30k in my 2005 reg multijet Panda and for the mony its a cracker.
I commute 35 miles to work each day on a mix of slow A & B roads with a long fast A stretch and it gives a reported 65 mpg as long as you make the effort to drive with a bit of foresight (the trip comp is about 5% optomistic) keeping below 70 the noise levels are acceptable ride comfort is good and the build I find very good for the money. I have been through 1 pair of tyres and am getting ready to buy a second pair for the optional alloys.
I bought Fiat seat covers as the fabric on the seats is a colour that will discolour easily.
The only warranty work required so far was when an emission light came on whilst I was away for an extended period & my wife had a local dealer sort it some valve she reported it to me as however she did say it took the garage a while to replace. I find the load space adequate but maybe the split rear bench option is worthwhile. The stereo is ok too though whats the city button for as the steering is light enough anyway. One disappointment was that I had to buy a locking fuel cap though I am sure most dealers would throw it in. I paid £7100 with alloys and Red paint but Ill bet you can get a better deal now though tried a couple of dealers one was the usual difficult to get a deal out of but did eventually offer to match the garage I eventually got it from. Wouldnt like to have to batter it along at high motorway speeds as noise becomes tiresome and economy nosedives. Cheap to insure & tax. Hope this helps
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - fiatfreak
Hi, interested in what you say about plummeting economy at high speeds. I borrowed one for a 24-hour test-drive recently: as long as I stuck to the many & various speed limits on A & B roads, I was looking at 63-67 mpg on the trip-computer (which you interestingly say reads 5% fast). But as soon as I 'blatted' along a deserted motorway at high speeds, this fell to 47; and by the time I'd returned the car the following morning, using the same motorway but now heavily-congested, it was reading 51 - which I thought a bit disappointing. Mind you, I recently hired a Peugeot 107 petrol (alias Toyota Aygo), and it only did 45-46 overall - assuming the odometer was accurate - so everything's relative...

Don't remember the Panda becoming particularly noisy at high speeds - whereas the 107 drowned-out the radio - completely! - on the M54 at anything much more than 70, so again it's all relative.

What you've very usefully thrown-up, is that the Panda Multijet is even more of a nose-heavy little beast than the petrol version (which is to be expected), and that it chews through its front tyres. You talk of virtually two sets in 30,000 miles: if this is representative, it needs to be off-set against the low fuel, V.E.D., and insurance costs of the car. Back in 1996 I bought a Cinquecento Sporting which, like your particular Panda, was on alloy wheels and low-profile tyres: it consumed its front tyres in 12,000 miles with monotonous regularity - but its back ones hardly at all. Fiat must then have 'got at' Pirelli for giving their cars a bad reputation in this respect, so Pirelli then appears to have changed the rubber-compound. Result: 30,000 miles per set of fronts, 75,000 per set of rears - I'm not kidding! - and lousy wet-weather grip...

Lastly: Panda reliability. I asked the dealer I've bought several baby Fiats from about this question. The answer, very much like that given by one of the other respondents, is that they come in for routine service and then they go out again - with no 'untoward' work needing to be done. When I invited them to say the same thing about the Punto (or any other Fiat), they poilitely declined! I would agree with the respondent who suggested that Polish-built Fiats (like the Panda) were better than Italian-built ones (the rest).

Unfortunately the new 500 has been such a runaway success all over Europe that Fiat are now said to be contemplating building it in Italy as well as Poland: the Polish-built one I drove recently was one of the best-built cars of any description that I've ever been in. I rather doubt that the same thing will be able to be said about an Italian-built one - but how will one know, when placing the order, where one's shiny new motor will be coming from?
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - madf
My first set of Yaris tyres lasted 26k miles at the front. The rears were 60% worn (but a nail ruined one so I replaced them as well...)

A lot depends on your driving style. Round here fast cornering on country roads = sudden death or mutilation or drowning or contact with a stone wall...or a cow or a bunch of walkers:-)
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - fiatfreak
Of course you're right: a lot depends on the way a car is driven. On the other hand, when I complained to my dealer about the 12,000-mile life of the front tyres on the Cinquecento Sporting they'd sold me, they said they thought I'd done very well! And I thought of myself in those days as a pretty fast driver...


One thing I failed to say, is that Fiats CAN still snap their clutch-cables. My Seicento Sporting has just done this, at 6 years of age and ca 50,000 miles. With the car's front wheels hard against a high kerb, when I depressed the clutch there was a loud bang and the pedal went straight to the floor. Being an "old pink fluffy dice" I knew how to get the car home using just the synchromesh and the ignition key - but I rather wonder how many of today's young drivers could have managed it: the young salesman at the Fiat dealer's certainly listened in wide-eyed wonder as I told him the story!

Edited by Dynamic Dave on 16/02/2008 at 21:58

Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - paulb {P}
Some interesting points about tyre wear on Multijet Pandas - funnily enough I looked at the front ones (Conti EcoContacts) on ours today and was surprised to note that there is just under 3mm of tread left at just over 11k miles.

This is to be contrasted with our Mondeo TDCi, which aside from being much heavier and twice as powerful, is driven a fair sight harder but will do nearly 25k on a front pair (Bridgestone ER30).

I did wonder if this is partly a feature of EcoContacts though - anyone able to enlighten as to how these wear compared with other makes?
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - doctorchris
My daughter's Panda 1.1 Active runs on these tyres and after 22,000 miles there is plenty of tread left. However, I do rotate tyres back to front and vice versa every 6,000 miles so all 4 tyres are about the same. I reckon the set of 4 will last until about 30,000 miles.
The 1.3 MJ is a different kettle of fish. Heavier, especially at the front and with a lot more power and torque than the 1.1. Your front tyre wear seems about right and i don't think you will find a significantly harder wearing make. Why not rotate the tyres though. Otherwise you end up with slightly worn rears that are still on the car long after they have deteriorated through age rather than use.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - oilrag

Our MK2B Punto 1.3 Multijet van is on original Firestone `Fuelsaver`165/70 R14 tyres and estimated front end wear will be around 23,000.
It would be interesting to know the tyre size on the Panda 1.3 Multijet and the comparative weight. I think our van is around 1,000KG

regards

Edited by oilrag on 17/02/2008 at 09:58

Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - paulb {P}
doctorchris - good advice re. rotating - I'll give that a go.

oilrag - 155/80 13. Always struck me as a bit skinny, but seem to do the job OK & the extra weight does improve stability - our old 1.2 petrol (with same wheels and tyres) always felt a bit skittish and prone to understeer. Not sure about kerb weight but fairly sure <1 tonne.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - krebb industries
Stumbled across this thread whilst looking for a locking fuel cap for my 2 day old multijet panda.......

The car always had a good report from HJ, and I've fancied one for ages. Then the wife decides she needs to start driving again and wants a small car. Diesel, of course !

Its just done 113 miles, from stop start rush hour traffic, to A roads and a 75mph, 55 mile cruise along the M60. The car is very quiet, even when cold (not tried sub-zero yet) and thanks to the high gearing the car purrs along at normal way speeds. Ihe car is very quiet for a little tin box, and I'm impressed with the refinement

One odd thing is that the accelerator has very long travel, so you have to give it a real push to get going. I always hate running in cars, but diesels need to be driven hard(ish) to prevent bore glazing and associated high oil consumption.

The engine is still very tight, and the oil is still clear, but 70mpg was shown on an A road trip, dipping to 48mpg at a steady 75.

With a few more miles and a looser engine, I'm expecting better but am more than satisfied with the car - its a little belter.

BTW previous experince with tyres has led me to favour Michelin Energy ones. They're quiet, grip well and do make a difference. They also seem to last for ages too. If you're in Costco, they do very reasonable prices for tyres. They quite £35 for an energy tyre for the Panda.

Edited by krebb industries on 04/05/2008 at 21:14

Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - madf
My Yaris diesel gets about 26,000 out of front tyres. And rears.. cos I swap around.
I use Bridgestones as my local garage has a cheap deal.. about £33 balanced and fitted per wheel.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - paulj56
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - paulj56
Stumbled across this thread whilst looking for a locking fuel cap for my 2 day old multijet panda....... The car always had a good report from HJ, and I've fancied one for ages. Then the wife decides she needs to start driving again and wants a small car. Diesel, of course ! Its just done 113 miles, from stop start rush hour traffic, to A roads and a 75mph, 55 mile cruise along the M60. The car is very quiet, even when cold (not tried sub-zero yet) and thanks to the high gearing the car purrs along at normal way speeds. Ihe car is very quiet for a little tin box, and I'm impressed with the refinement One odd thing is that the accelerator has very long travel, so you have to give it a real push to get going. I always hate running in cars, but diesels need to be driven hard(ish) to prevent bore glazing and associated high oil consumption. The engine is still very tight, and the oil is still clear, but 70mpg was shown on an A road trip, dipping to 48mpg at a steady 75. With a few more miles and a looser engine, I'm expecting better but am more than satisfied with the car - its a little belter. BTW previous experince with tyres has led me to favour Michelin Energy ones. They're quiet, grip well and do make a difference. They also seem to last for ages too. If you're in Costco, they do very reasonable prices for tyres. They quite £35 for an energy tyre for the Panda.

Sure you its a diesel, oil clean, mine doesnt look clean when he has just changed it, i have had 2 multijets and both used oil till around 3000 miles and settled down to using none, mine now is nearing 90000 miles and runs superb far better than when it was new.

Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - babbo umbro
Tyre wear.

On Cinquecento Sporting the Goodyear alternative to Pirelli is a far superior tyre - fronts last 15,000 miles or so.

More importantly, for some years the official advice on tyres on frontwheel drive cars is to put new tyres on the BACK and swap used backs to the front, otherwise backs never wear out but become dangerous. Much better than rotating.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - samuelramsbottom

I would just like to point out that this is a very sensible measure.

Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - paulj56
Some interesting points about tyre wear on Multijet Pandas - funnily enough I looked at the front ones (Conti EcoContacts) on ours today and was surprised to note that there is just under 3mm of tread left at just over 11k miles. This is to be contrasted with our Mondeo TDCi, which aside from being much heavier and twice as powerful, is driven a fair sight harder but will do nearly 25k on a front pair (Bridgestone ER30). I did wonder if this is partly a feature of EcoContacts though - anyone able to enlighten as to how these wear compared with other makes?

My multijet i get about 14000 out of front tyres, but i usually change them every 12 month service, the tracking does not easily go out, the pandas have a slight positive camber, and to prove this took it for 4 wheel tracking after 90000 miles and 5 years motoring, and it was spot on , it has never been touched, ITS DOWN TO POSITIVE CAMBER.

Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - joe9109
Hi just to keep you up to date had my second warranty claim in march when in for 36k service i had noticed a gradual minor coolant loss over 3 years asked garage to check & they reckoned it was the water pump so new one fitted. Incidentally garage Walkers of South Otterington very good service manager Steve very helpful & Knowledgeable proper village garage. At same time replaced the radio volume button kids + radios dont mix thought was expensive for a placcy knob though.
Subsequntly had big problem with tailgate not locking well central locking going a bit nuts phoned Walkers up they had seen problem before & disconnected plug for tailgate handle m/switch they ordered up new handle assy fixed it cost me £90 as Fiat turned down the warranty claim. Subsequently I wrote Fiat a nice letter and they sent me a cheque after a short delay. Always pays to ask nicely. Anyway 39K on Mjet Panda now my journey has become a weekly 140 mile each way blat to & fro from West Mids economy 60-65 mpg.
Still a happy bunny car is v good for the money just a bit less of an advantage over petrol versions as diesel 10%+ more than petrol but I still think Mjet best engine available in a Panda though if they were to fit out one with a higher powered version of same motor + bits off 100hp then that would be my next purchase.
Any suggestions on tyre choice for next set of rubber would be welcome for the alloys to improve mpg and tyre roar.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - bintang
The reason I rejected the Panda (and the new Punto) was that I couldn't accommodate to the awkward left foot rest.

I would recommend an extended test drive for any car. My local Fiat dealer was happy to let me have cars for a couple of days.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - stunorthants26
Not trying to be funny, but why is the Panda diesel so thirsty? I know high 50's is good an all, but its the same sized car as my Charade and mine does 59 mpg on petrol ( almost exlusively round town ), so surely a diesel should be doing better than that and surely better CO2?

Im just puzzled about why the Panda isnt streets ahead of the Charade in the same way that diesel usually are over their petrol counterparts?
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - colinh
Same engine to be used in the revised Ford Ka (produced alongside the Fiat 500 in Poland), and suppposedly "will be good for 75bhp and 145Nm of torque, while returning more than 50mpg." - which is pathetic in the current climate.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - paulj56

Same engine to be used in the revised Ford Ka (produced alongside the Fiat 500 in Poland), and suppposedly "will be good for 75bhp and 145Nm of torque, while returning more than 50mpg." - which is pathetic in the current climate.

Certainly a big improvement on the crap it replaced, ford can call it what they like durotorq whatever but the old ka you would only get early 30s out of it, and the 4 month old car i had to buy off my daughter was already rusting, so fiat building new ka big big improvement

Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - smokescreen
Agreed, I can get 50mpg out of an xsara with a reasonable foot!
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - stunorthants26
I think its telling that the Mini diesel, a decently quick car, can almost equal it on economy and the Cit C1 diesel is some way ahead. atleast on paper.
Since the whole point of a diesel is pretty much economy, what is it about the multijet that makes it weak in economy stakes, atleast in the Panda? Anyone know the drag figures on a Panda? Im just wondering if its let down by aerodynamic issues rather than the engine.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - oilrag
Stu, According to Parkers your Charade only weighs in at 720kg. Perhaps part of the answer is there.
My Mk2b Punto van 1.3 Multijet, weighs 1,008kg and gets into the low 70`s with a return trip best of 79mpg.

I think the Panda`s not much different in weight to mine, nearly 300kg up on the Charade is a fair bit of extra weight although a some of that will go in increased size, strength and galvanising.

According to the Australian, the Charade is a Micro Car, so perhaps you`re comparing to a class up when you compare the Panda.

tinyurl.com/5gdmtf

It just shows though, we should be getting diesels into cars the weight of yours. Perhaps the impending diesel and petrol twins from Fiat will take us in that direction.

regards

Edited by oilrag on 31/05/2008 at 19:54

Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - stunorthants26
Oilrag - your right of course, the Charade is a light car, point taken on that. Maybe its just the driving style of some owners which accounts for the poor figures as it would seem that there is more to come, but as ever, some cars find it much harder to get to the combined than others.

The Panda is as far as I can tell, is marketed as a city car, exactly the same as the Charade. Not only that but the rear legroom and interior space in the Charade is comparable to the Panda. The Charade actually has more rear legroom than our Forester had, its a miracle of packaging but entirely true.
Oh and get this - the Charade, according to HJ, got a 4-star NCAP rating, so its obviously not lacking strength? The Panda, according to the info I could get, is a 3-star, so whats going on thereIts only 10 cm shorter too.

I absolutely agree that a diesel in a car like the Charade would be a very interesting prospect indeed and its a mystery as to why nobody has yet done it.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - oilrag
Because it more than good enough with the petrol I guess Stu, and balanced around that units weight.
I`m not convinced 16 valves helps economy on the Multijet. It notable that the 1.4 HDI in the Citroen is 8 valve.

Looks like your Charade is just what you needed. Glad you`re enjoying it ;)
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - oilrag
"Maybe its just the driving style of some owners which accounts for the poor figures"

Agreed Stu, Its the turbo boost on diesels I think and how its used.

My colleague had a Maestro or Montego? with turbo, my Maestro had not. Both Perkins Prima`s in the early 90`s.
I was getting up to 60mpg, he struggled to get 40.

The reason I can get well into the 70`s on the Multijet is that I drive it on very minimal boost while accelerating. But I guess a lot of drivers floor the throttle.

If a driver moves from petrol to turbo diesel doing that, IMO they have more to loose on economy in the diesel.

Just a thought ;)
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - stunorthants26
It is thanks :-) the more time I spend with it, the more Im convinced it is a very underrated car. Im not anti-Fiat Panda funny enough, but im very glad that I have my Charade instead of a Panda, which incidentally, I had the chance of buying at the same dealer - it was the cheap tax and economy that swung it for the Daijit in the end, but now ive piled 1500 miles onto it, Im becoming very aware of just how deep its talent goes.

Even bearing in mind that its economy is good with petrol, I get the impression it would be perfectly possible to design a city car that has a good overall set of talents and still be light and carry a diesel unit effectively. Obviously there are many cars in the pipeline along these lines, so one can hope that they do move the game on significantly in terms of everyday economy.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - oilrag
why don`t you give us all a review on it Stu, in a new thread?
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - stunorthants26
I mite get told off, my threads have a habit of dragging out!
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - dumbo
The small diesels mentioned don't seem much more economical, in the real world, than my 2002 Vauxhall Astra Estate 1.7dti. I average around 50mpg, every time brim to brim. Mind you, I don't race about but I do plenty of short journeys such as trips to specialist shops on industrial estates. These are timed to avoid rush hours.

On a long, gentle motorway trip on which the speed limit is not broken, my car will do around 55mpg.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - mattbod
With the price of Diesel as it is I question the merits of small Diesels like this, particularly as the Mulitjet is way more complicated than the petrol engines. I'd go for the 1.2 and enjoy revving it as this is what small Fiats are about to me (My first car was a Fiat Uno 45 FIRE). My personal favorite small car though is the Citroen C1. The little Toyota triple is a gem. It will do 50 mpg and yet has more character than any small Diesel. You can get some great deals on it as well (seem to be discounted more than the idenetical Peugeot 107 and Toyota Aygo.

Edited by Mattbod on 31/05/2008 at 22:51

Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - daveym
I posted a while ago about my company car, the 6 speed Astra CDTi - which I think uses the same engine as the Panda and other small diesels?

Very, very laggy from a standing start - rev it less than 3k if y9ou need a quick start and it will near enough stall.

However once its up to speed its very nice to drive - very torquey for what is only a 1.3 diesel... so I imagine the same engine in a little car with less bulk to shift would be pretty good. I wouldn't mind trying the Panda.

That said, when I do change my car, my budget will be 3-4k on finance, so I'd rather get a slightly older familymobile and benefit from the comfort and toys that come with it at the expense of 3mpg if I get the right engine to match it!
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - samuelramsbottom

I kind of agree. Diesels are a slightly more work to maintain I imagine (heavier components moving with greater power). But, you get more power than a petrol and hence a better mileage. True, diesel is pricy and that is perhaps the major drawback, and why petrols are a cheaper option. I can see what you mean when you consider the new value of a diesel. Performance of the Fiat Panda petrol to diesel is almost the same - the diesel is only a tad faster as a result of its turbo aspiration.

Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - SteveLee
I absolutely agree that a diesel in a car like the Charade would be a very interesting prospect indeed and its a mystery as to why nobody has yet done it.

Daihatsu themselves have done it - 23years ago there was A Daihatsu Charade turbo diesel. It didn't sell very well and was overshadowed by the legendary Gtti, gently driven you could eak out well over 70mpg - professional drivers in economy competitions achieved around 100mpg! I think the Charade is superb - light as a small car should be and therefore very efficient. The Panda's a little cracker, the MJ isn't particularly economical, however you get big car performance on the motorway which is the point I suppose. As for all this stuff about Fiats and clutch cables - there is probably some truth it in, I'd rather have a simple snapped cable than the whole mounting assembly and cable tearing itself through the bulkhead as used to be the case with Mk1 Golfs and Jettas - I don't see people moaning about that even though it was very common! All cars have faults some less than others.
Multijet diesel - fiatfreak - paulj56
Hi just to keep you up to date had my second warranty claim in march when in for 36k service i had noticed a gradual minor coolant loss over 3 years asked garage to check & they reckoned it was the water pump so new one fitted. Incidentally garage Walkers of South Otterington very good service manager Steve very helpful & Knowledgeable proper village garage. At same time replaced the radio volume button kids + radios dont mix thought was expensive for a placcy knob though. Subsequntly had big problem with tailgate not locking well central locking going a bit nuts phoned Walkers up they had seen problem before & disconnected plug for tailgate handle m/switch they ordered up new handle assy fixed it cost me £90 as Fiat turned down the warranty claim. Subsequently I wrote Fiat a nice letter and they sent me a cheque after a short delay. Always pays to ask nicely. Anyway 39K on Mjet Panda now my journey has become a weekly 140 mile each way blat to & fro from West Mids economy 60-65 mpg. Still a happy bunny car is v good for the money just a bit less of an advantage over petrol versions as diesel 10%+ more than petrol but I still think Mjet best engine available in a Panda though if they were to fit out one with a higher powered version of same motor + bits off 100hp then that would be my next purchase. Any suggestions on tyre choice for next set of rubber would be welcome for the alloys to improve mpg and tyre roar. continental ecocontact 3 superb

Multijet diesel - annette1010
Has anyone done a significant mileage yet in the Fiat Panda 1.3 Multijet diesel? HJ
raves about it and that's always a good sign. What about noise levels? Load space?
Is Fiat build quality up with the best these days? It may be a bit
on the small side for me but I'm tempted by 70+mpg on the open road.

>>


Hi Corrib.
Ive done nearly 90k in my panda diesel which I bought new 3 yrs ago. It runs very very well. It's serviced regularly(although not by the overpriced dealership!) and the only niggle I have is that it goes through front tyres quite quick and the tracking seems to go off easily. MPG I would say is more like just over 60 although the trip computer often shows a lovely 141.2 at times especially when you're coasting downhill etc ! Avoid the dealership at sorry can't name and shame- I find them overpriced and aftersales/service is very poor! I'd certainly have another panda- but not from them!
There has been one other fault which has cropped up which I wonder if anyone else has experienced- in heavy rain the airfilter gets soaked and the car loses most of its power- the air intake points straight forward at the holes in the radiator grille and it seems obvious that the water is forced in through there although the dealership says this is rubbish and unheard of..Anyone else had this problem. Also has anyone had any probs with the EMS warning light(the engine management system) coming on?
Thanks guys

Edited by Pugugly on 04/01/2010 at 08:57

Multijet diesel - retgwte


www.fiatforum.com/panda/

try posting these questions over at fiatforum
Multijet diesel - dawnb

Hi. I have the same problem with my fiat panda (06) multijet. After heavy rain it takes ages to start. It is very sluggish to start with. It is then o.k for the rest of the day.

Can anyone help please?

Many thanks

Multijet diesel - SteveLee
I notice some people recommending tyre rotation due to heavy front tyre wear on the multijet Panda, considering it's a fairly light car with a heavy front end bias, I'd avoid rotating tyres to even-out wear - doing so could be dangerous. If anything, allow the front tyres to wear down, put the rears on the front (opposite sides of course) and the fresh rubber on the rears. In other words always have the freshest rubber on the rear and don't let the rears wear beyond 3.5mm tread depth. Light front wheel drive cars tend to aquaplane rear end first - especially a car with such front end bias like the diesel Panda, having newer rubber on the front is asking for a nasty situation if you hit a puddle at speed.
Multijet diesel - barksandbytes

We've just put our second set of front tyres on at 49k and changed the rears for the first time at 41k, so it's not particularly hard on tyres. The tracking, though, does get out of line very easily. I paid £25 to have the tracking sorted in March, when the rear tyres were changed, and have just been told this week that it's out and caused uneven wear on the fronts (hence the change mentioned above). So another £25!! That means at this rate I'll be doing the tracking two-three times a year, the same cost as a couple of tyres!! RIDICULOUS!!!

Multijet diesel - paulj56
>> Has anyone done a significant mileage yet in the Fiat Panda 1.3 Multijet diesel? HJ >> raves about it and that's always a good sign. What about noise levels? Load space? >> Is Fiat build quality up with the best these days? It may be a bit >> on the small side for me but I'm tempted by 70+mpg on the open road. >> Hi Corrib. Ive done nearly 90k in my panda diesel which I bought new 3 yrs ago. It runs very very well. It's serviced regularly(although not by the overpriced dealership!) and the only niggle I have is that it goes through front tyres quite quick and the tracking seems to go off easily. MPG I would say is more like just over 60 although the trip computer often shows a lovely 141.2 at times especially when you're coasting downhill etc ! Avoid the dealership at sorry can't name and shame- I find them overpriced and aftersales/service is very poor! I'd certainly have another panda- but not from them! There has been one other fault which has cropped up which I wonder if anyone else has experienced- in heavy rain the airfilter gets soaked and the car loses most of its power- the air intake points straight forward at the holes in the radiator grille and it seems obvious that the water is forced in through there although the dealership says this is rubbish and unheard of..Anyone else had this problem. Also has anyone had any probs with the EMS warning light(the engine management system) coming on? Thanks guys

If the front tyres wear slightly on the inside dont let the numb nuts over hear touch the tracking, it is nothing to do with that, its because the panda has slight positive camber, but the under trained tyre fitters over here like to earn there bonus and F-ck your car up by tracking it, dont let them near it.

Multijet diesel - barksandbytes

Hi, We've done nearly 49k over four years and consistently get 65mpg out of our Panda. The highest was 72mpg on a long run to Devon on holiday. We've filled it to the roof with camping gear, dogs and have a trailer/towbar too. I've often taken trailer loads to the tip and bought loads home from the garden centre etc and the mpg is consistently great. The key to this is keep to a steady 60mph whenever possible, break only when necessary (SAFED courses will help with this) and never accelerate hard through the gears. On the fault front it's tiny and you can barely get a weeks shopping in the boot, there's no leg room for passengers and the gearing ratios are awful for driving around town. I'd give it a 7 out of 10.

Edited by barksandbytes on 27/10/2010 at 16:48

Panda diesel 2005-2010 - samuelramsbottom

Hi

I drove the Panda as my first car (Multijet 1.3). I can report that it is a great performer. Yes, gear ratios are what you might expect from a small car. It is noisy when starting up and cold. Ride can be a little without feel on such instances, but performance is overall very good. Torque is great (around 110-120 lbs/ft). So a proper diesel.

It's not as racy as a petrol, but Mpg is around 55mpg combined (brand-new in 2005). Very good. A few issues with handling. It is certainly heavier at the front. Suspension is very good but keep it slow on sharp speed bumps. Don't try overtaking any Ferraris. It's a basic vehicle. Legroom is alright - good for children in the back or four to five adults can squash in for a 10 mile or so journey.

If you experience high tyre wear on the front wheels that you didn't quite expect, follow the guidance of another post on this forum and ensure there is good rear tyre tread depth as aquaplaning will affect you on the rear of the car. Do this to avoid an accident. I think we're at a little over 60,000 miles and this equals three sets of well-used tyres. So, you need a new pair at around every 20,000 miles I think, but of course it depends. (Samuel)

Panda diesel 2005-2010 - Collos25

Fiat have just released the pictures of the new range of Fiats including the Panda and they look very nice indeed,since they bought chrysler they will be renaming some cars Lancia and restyling most of the chrysler range .The project is called the Fiat offensive.

Panda diesel 2005-2010 - diddy1234

Some of the earlier posts commented that a Charade was performing better on economy than today's diesel cars.

Although a valid point, there is one obvious fact to remember.

Vehicle weight has gone up due to ever increasing safety laws over the past 20 years.

If a multijet diesel engine was fitted into a Charade then I bet you'd see 100mpg easily.

Back in the early 80's Rover were working on an all aluminium car (the AR6) and this promised 100mpg with it's 3 cylinder petrol engine.

Safety was not a designed in component back then.

Just look at the weight of a Corsa today, 1,300kgs for a little 1.2l engine to pull is not great.
Ford have a better idea with the Fiesta only weighing in at 930kgs.

I am not sure how they both compare on safety ratings though.

So it would appear that you can have safety or very good economy but not both.

Panda diesel 2005-2010 - samuelramsbottom

Lightness helps a lot with mpg achieved. Hence a Smart Car for two will manage around 80mpg in forgiving circumstances. That's with petrol. I would like to point out that if a Multijet diesel engine that weighed the same as a petrol engine was put in a Charade, then mpg would probably be around 80. The diesel Panda weighs 100kg more than the petrol. If they could make diesel engines lighter efficiency would rocket.

I hear the Smart Car is a safe car. On BBCs Top Gear they drove it into a solid barrier at 70mph. The door still opened and closed properly and damage was relatively minimal compared to other cars such as the Landrover Freelander. But few want or can afford such minimalism in their life. Think about your push bike. You can lift it over a fence singlehandedly when unladen, cycle to town on it on a chocolate bar or two, yet its a big struggle to carry any substantial load on the thing itself.

Basically, in agreement with the above post then, with anything practical such as a small car bigger than a Smart the matter of safety means weight gained in the safety features. The Toyota IQ is small but I think the number of air bags totals at around six. With reinforcements in the chassis and cabin comforts it loses lightness. My push bike's fast but it sure can't carry my food shopping! Society has always been slow for these very pragmatic burdens!

Edited by samuelramsbottom on 08/11/2010 at 23:21

Panda diesel 2005-2010 - samuelramsbottom

It is likely that there could be more restrictions on car use in the future. I agree with the below post: petrols are very efficient options these days. The IQ does around 64mpg, for example, and its the same weight as a Panda diesel. But it's an £11,000 motor. It will be interesting to see how cars evolve. Perhaps we will see them become more minimalistic.

Multijet diesel - Avant

Since this thread started, over three years ago, it's worth mentioning that there are now some highly efficient petrol engines around (not least from Fiat) which come near to diesel economy, are much quieter and don't suffer from the nose-heaviness that you get with a diesel lump in the front of a small car.

It's possible that the diesel's shorter tyre life can negate quite a lot of the lessening margin of extra mpg over a petrol - not to mention the expensive repairs that diesel engines will need when the miles pile up and they are, of course, out of warranty.

Edited by Avant on 08/11/2010 at 23:25

Multijet diesel - retgwte

in the case of the panda the multijet is chain cam and basically needs little maintenance other than oil changes and consumables such as brake pads and tyres etc

the petrol pandas have cam belts which are expensive to replace and a failure point

yes the new 2 cylinder fiat petrol engine sounds good, but its only 2 cylinders so one plug goes and you aint going anywhere, where as multijet would keep going on 3 cylinders no problem

also the multijet is a very relaxing drive with lots of grunt, one of the few small cars i would be happy to drive long distance

and so on

Multijet diesel - samuelramsbottom

I haven't needed to do anything physical to our Multijet engine. Longetivity seems to be a real asset of this design, and diesel all over.

Multijet diesel - madf

It's possible that the diesel's shorter tyre life can negate quite a lot of the lessening margin of extra mpg over a petrol - not to mention the expensive repairs that diesel engines will need when the miles pile up and they are, of course, out of warranty.

I contributed to this thread earlier: about 2007 - when I had bought a 2003 Yaris diesel. Still going strong.. average 57mpg mainly urban. 65+ on long runs..

Shorter tyre life? last lot - cheap and nasty - lasted 30k miles - rotated front to rear. I expect 40k from new Michelin Energy.

Reapirs to engine? What are repairs? Apart from voluntary cleaning of EGR valve - 30 mins/not very dirty - just oil and filters...

Lots of Yaris diesels going strong with well over 100k cars.. But it's Toyota and not Fiat...

Original exhaust system: immaculate...

New front discs and pads, new anti roll bar bushes, new tyres. Oil and filter changes.. Period. in 5 years...

Edited by madf on 09/11/2010 at 09:36

Multijet diesel - joe9109

Well over 5 years down the line & I have found the Panda to be a very cost effective car overall cheap tax insurance decent economy. Its not perfect but good for the money hardest thing is to find a good garage to maintain it, it has had the usual Panda weaknesses tailgate handle, water pump 2 EGR vaves & I see signs of new glow plugs & discs are down to minimum now but at 76k can you grumble thats pretty much it other than tyres (dont buy avon cr's ) a couple of sets of wiper blades. It gets 2 oil changes a year regardless of mileage.

Not quite a Toyota but close

Multijet diesel - paulj56
"Has anyone done a significant mileage yet in the Fiat Panda 1.3 Multijet diesel? HJ raves about it and that's always a good sign. What about noise levels? Load space? Is Fiat build quality up with the best these days? It may be a bit on the small side for me, but I'm tempted by 70+mpg on the open road."

Yes i have been doing 25000 miles a year in my panda multijet coming up to 90000 miles, and apart from a juddering clutch at 15000 miles replaced under warranty, the only things i have changed is one stop light bulb, and a set of front discs, the car has been excellent, and far better than our toyota lease cars, the yaris stop start keeps packing in, one side of dashboard fell off, and the rav 4s have had 3 new engines between them, but brain washed britain think they are reliable total rot. give me the panda anyday.

Edited by Avant on 15/10/2011 at 22:07

Multijet diesel - fudgepanda

I bought my Panda MJ in March 05 when it first came out. So far it's covered 81,000 miles. Apart from wiper blades and a battery, tyres generally last around 35,000 and is currently on a set of Avons which are perhaps a little sporty for the car as it tends to tramline a touch in the left hand lane of motorways whereas the previous Avons & the Contis it came with didn't. It's also had new new anti-roll bar drop links courtesy of speed humps. Otherwise it's only consumed service parts. My commute is 13 miles each way with 11 of them on motorway and typical fuel consumption is 55 - 60 mpg. A slightly longer journey would better that and a fairly relaxed national speed limit cross country run would return about 62. Most Italian cars I've run over the last few years have had trip computers that are slightly pessimistic unlike another poster on here, the Panda being 5 - 10% out. The only potential cloud on the horizon is that the camchain will probably need replacing after 80,000 miles (any time now in fact) and it'll cost. Probably about £600 from a specialist and more at a FIAT dealer. Nonetheless, I'll have another to replace this one although my mileage may not warrant another diesel, but then in 2005 it was also the most powerful version until the 100HP arrived the next year. It is a little noisy on start up from cold like most diesels but is refined at 70 with both engine, road and wind noise well suppressed for a small car and having a normal conversation is a piece of cake. The boot is obviously small, but for a young family a roof box would do it. The boot will only really take one large case and a soft bag.

Would I have another? Like a shot although I'm not sure whether it will be another Multijet or a Twin Air.

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