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Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol  
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - automaticallyuk
Are you less likely to stall Diesel cars such as the Yaris D4d, VW, PDi's etc than similar petrol cars? Because they have more Torque, or is diesel harder to stall by the nature of the fuel system. A lot of diesel cars I have been in will allow you to lift the clutch with no use of the gas pedal, whereas some petrol cars kangaroo or stall even if you give them some gas. If this is the case why not make all cars like the Pdi range, ie 200+ lbs of torque.

Also diesel cars require less gear changes and lower revs than petrol, and are more efficient over short journeys from cold.

Anyone got a good diesel car, which fits the above?

Tags: technical issues diesels petrol or diesel? DPF

Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - mlj
Almost impossible to stall a TD. You list the reasons and many of the advantages. All of today's diesels are as you describe.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - sean
Yes, great fun in traffic jams. You just lift the clutch and off it goes. Never stalled my Golf TDi yet.

My daughter's Arosa SDi is just the same.

In winter it gets even better. Petrols have nasty chokes and enrichment devices. Diesels don't, so you get none of that wheezy lurching and excessive engine wear due to petrol washing oil out of the cylinders.

Relaxing on motorways too. How does 75mph at about 2000rpm sound?

Diesel = Very good thing.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - mlj
In fact, it is possible to get to about to 35 mph through the gears without touching the throttle. Then you have to, saves a little fuel but does dreadful things to your 0-60 figures....
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Johnny20
It's one of the old diesel's but I have never stalled my Corolla 2.0D, it pulls off without any gas in 1st and can pull off in 3rd - done by accident once, i'm sure that can't be good for it.
I am forever stalling my dad's Avensis D4D though.

As for 0-60 times, I gave up a long time a go!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - automaticallyuk
So people would recommend a NEW YARIS 1.4 D4D T2 3dr for £7,395 with a years free insurance. I don't want central locking, E/windows or a CD player, and the normal old yaris performed very well without the side and passenger airbag. So the base model which now comes with ABS, EBD and PAS must be the best value new diesel you can buy, anyone agree? The insurance would cost me at least £500, so you get a good, new modern diesel car for less than £7K! Bet it would be worth £4K after three years too!

Any Yaris owners care to comment too!?
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - sean
Don't know how much they cost now, but I highly rate the Seat Arosa 1.7SDi or (probably too dear) the 1.4TDi 3-cylinder.

Really well built with a lovely engine.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - andymc {P}
My Leon TDi does all the things you originally described - in fact, I was playing with the engine the other day and let it crawl up a steep hill, in fifth, at about 23 mph, with no feet on the pedals. I was able to do this in every single gear! Have a look at the Ibiza as a quicker alternative to the Yaris, for not much more dosh.
andymc
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Gazza
Just an experience.

My friend and I rented a new Mercedes Sprinter 308 CDI for a weekend to move house last year.

I drove the first journey and stalled twice. He laughed at me, laughing at how I managed to stall a diesel.

He drove the second journey and stalled twice. I laughed at him, laughing at how he managed to stall a diesel, especially his family has an old Astra diesel.

How we laughed, laughing at how little torque a new diesel engine generates.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - PR {P}
I agree diesels are easy to drive. Some petrols are aswell however. I can put mine in 6th gear at 20mph and it will go all the way to 155(should I want!) without changing gear. Its a 3.2V6 so is not quite as efficient!!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - KB.
So people would recommend a NEW YARIS 1.4 D4D T2 3dr
for £7,395 with a years free insurance. I don't want
central locking, E/windows or a CD player, and the normal old
yaris performed very well without the side and passenger airbag.
So the base model which now comes with ABS, EBD and
PAS must be the best value new diesel you can buy,
anyone agree? The insurance would cost me at least £500,
so you get a good, new modern diesel car for less
than £7K! Bet it would be worth £4K after three
years too!
Any Yaris owners care to comment too!?


Yaris D4D owner here! Had it since Septemer. Absolutely no probs. (1 brake pipe recall done @ local dealer). 49 mpg round town. Nippy enough for most. Quiet enough for most. With the free insurance it must be worth having, especially if bought at as good a discount as poss. Paid £9,300 new for my personally imported CDX and don't reckon the depreciation will amount to too much after 3 years. No problems driving it (but then you wouldn't expect it). Haven't noticed much difference between petrol and diesel regarding driving/stalling but I don't drive quickly so diesel suits me fine. It is the case though that you'll not be able to do 30mph in 5th. If driving round town in 30mph limits then 4th will be used with occasional use of 3rd. I don't agree that constant use of 3rd at 30mph is strictly necessary but do agree that 5th is out of the question at this speed.

Do it!
KB.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - v8man
You lot should not be stalling any car if you are driving properly. It shows a lack of mechanical sympathy expecting to pull away at idle.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - RichardP
My Vectra TD (with tuning box) goes up steep multi-storey car park ramps in first with no 'gas' and hardly slows down at all! I also love blasting up the steep crawler lanes in the right lane in 4th or sometimes fifth gear, leaving most things behind!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - AlanGowdy
After years of owning petrol engined cars I recently bought my first diesel. It has VW's 130 PD engine and is a revelation.

It pulls smoothly from idle and strongly from 1200 rpm.
It has kick-in-the-back midrange punch for overtaking.
Its top speed is 130mph.
The engine turns at just 2100 rpm at 80 mph in sixth gear, yet will still accelerate strongly.
I get over 50 mpg overall and even when driven hard it doesn't drop below the high forties.

I did once stall it though - at a roundabout.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - leatherpatches
Hate to break it to you guys, but my 2.0 petrol will trickle along in slow traffic without throttle in 1st, 2nd or 3rd. Furthermore, I can pull away on an uphill incline in 6th and took the car from 35mph to 135mph in 5th the other day (on a track of course).

I never have to change down from 6th when overtaking at motorway speeds and the last mpg figures were 31mpg, 30mpg and 32mpg. (I know this is worse than the 40mpg that Car magazine returned from their Golf PDi 150 but IMO buying/servicing costs outway etc.)

Oh, and did I mention...0-60 in 6.4s?

Not knocking diesel performance, just pointing out that these are not uniquely diesel characteristics.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
Why would anybody want to be in 3rd gear in slow traffic?

(unless you call 40mph slow of course)
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - leatherpatches
Actually, third gear suits me from about 5mph to 30mph, some of which may constitute slow moving traffic (well it did in Exeter today, anyway). Don\'t forget that I am dividing by 6 ratios instead of 5 due to extra gear so my third is more like your 2.5 gear (actually less than that because 1st is just ridiculous).

Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
"my third is more like your 2.5 gear"

-ish. You mean like my 3rd (out of 6) that I use for speeds of 30-60? That 3rd?.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - busker
Alan,
If you get a chance, try a Mondeo 130 TDci. AS HJ's roriginal road report says "when you first get in and drive, its fantastic - then it gets better" I recently drove one from Leeds to Aviemore and back and cannot remember when I last enjoyed myself so much in a car on "normal" roads. All the bits you need (Ghia trim) supple ride, great mid range torque and (for me) perfect driving position. As it happens, I have a VW 130tdi demonstrater outside today, so I'll give it a thrash and see how it compares. Watch this space.............................
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - David R
More likely to stall the diesel, in contrast to all the other opinions.

Seat Alhambra TDi 115 2002 (VAG engine).

Pro
2000 rpm at 70 in 6th
Relaxed cruiser
Usual fuel economy benefits

Against
No power below 1500rpm, and therefore quite easy to stall if you get the gear wrong, particularly at a roundabout. SWMBO, who is an excellent driver, stalled the car frequently when new, until she figured this out. You definitely CAN stall a TDi!

Harsh engine noise is a definite issue at town traffic speeds
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - MikeC
2.0 Petrol Cavalier 70 in 5th = 2100rpm. Lower than all other cars I've driven inc diesels.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Miller
I must admit I have been a staunch anti-diesel man all my car owning life but I will be very tempted come the time to change my current car.

My cousins 320d simply blows my car away when it come to 3rd gear and above acceleration.



I'm a loser, baby....so why don't you kill me?!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Tom Shaw
I can't understand the obsession people seem to have about how slow they can go in the higher gears. All that loading on the major engine and transmission components does the car no good at all. The engine likes to breath and stretch itself, reving the thing (Within reason) is far better than labouring it with regard to long term reliability.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
Tom - let alone the massively reduced safety margin by deliberately being in the wrong gear.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - AlanGowdy
Leatherpatches - if my car only gave me 30 mpg, with fuel at its current exhorbitant price, I'd be suicidal. I do 500 miles a week for goodness sake!!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - teabelly
My dad is thoroughly obessessed with being able to be in 5th gear at 30 something miles an hour. Having a car pick up with gentle acceleration at low speeds is a sign of flexibility but not something I do on a regular basis. I think it is an old man thing :-)Diesel suits him because he drives in a very narrow rev range whereas I like to use more of mine so a diesel (unless a very petrol like one) would irritate. I have tried to tell him that being in the wrong gear doesn't do things any good but he thinks that if you keep the revs low as possible you will get the best fuel economy. Trying to persuade him that is not necessarily the case (I wish there was proof!) is an impossible struggle. He does about 15k a year and changes cars every 5-8 years , usually buying something about 2-3 years old and so far nothing that could be attributed to staying in higher gears has actually failed.
teabelly
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - J Bonington Jagworth
"..an old man thing"

I think it's to do with times past, when (petrol) engines had longer strokes and too many revs were to be avoided at all costs, because things would break. As you say, diesels suit people who drive in this mode, but whether you regard it as easier is a moot point. Horses for courses, really, but I've always found petrol more entertaining...
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - paul45
My experience of diesels has been that I often stall them when at junctions - why? - because in my petrol car I was always taught, and spookily enough it has stuck, to approach a junction in second and if you don't actually need to stop then pull away in second. I have found with VW 130PD, Renault 1.9CDi and Mondeo TDCi amongst others I have stalled by trying to pull away in second. As always I guess practice will make better.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
"approach a junction in second and if you don't actually need to stop then pull away in second."

The reason for this was that (in the bad old days) cars did not have synchromesh on first. First was only used from standing start. To compensate, they had a low second.

Now, first should be used in all cars for driving at walking speed - e.g in Tesco's car park.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - leatherpatches
TrevP and AlanGowdy: both fair enough points.

I was only getting 38mpg out of my old 306 Dturbo, however. This is not a great increase on 32mpg out of current car. Certainly not enough to offset the additional costs involved.

I have done nearly 4k miles since the 9 May when I got the car. This is with measures taken to ensure my mileage is kept down! (lift sharing etc.)

When objective figures are produced on fuel economy (i.e. independant tests and not owners or manufacturers figures), even low consumption cars that quote 50+mpg like the TDi golfs only get 40/41 mpg.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Cliff Pope
I think pulling away at idling has more to do with the engine management system than whether it's petrol or diesel.
My 93 Volvo 240 has an electronically-controlled idle set at 800rpm.
If I simply let the clutch up slowly the car pulls away and continues to idle at 800, travelling at about 3mph. The engine speed hardly varies as the clutch bites. The same if I change into 2nd. I assumed this was normal on all modern cars.
It is on old models that you need the skill of 'adjusting the revs' as you let the clutch in.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Tony N
I think pulling away at idling has more to do with
the engine management system than whether it's petrol or diesel.


Exactly right. Try letting a modern ford diesel pull the car along at idle in second gear+. Most of the time it won't, especially the new transit. Its the same thing that causes the TDCi starting/cutting-out problems.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Ellen
Yes, the ECU intervenes at low speeds and when decelerating in my Focus TDCi. Pulling at idle in second gear, the revs surge and the car lurches forward - not good in a queue of slow moving traffic! Also stalls when slowing down approaching junctions etc. Apparently parts of the engine (the flywheel?) can shatter at low revs and the ECU speeds up or cuts the engine before that can happen, or so say the experts on the owners club forum.

Never had these problems with my 1987 309 XL 1300.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - 3500S
Personally, I find petrol cars much easier to drive than diesel cars. If you want to pull away from stationary in any gear other than 1st, get an auto.

I find that 'hitting the sweet spot' in a diesel much more difficult, you need to know the right rev band, you need a gearbox that has the right ratios.

Without that, diesel are very difficult to master for safe overtaking and good progress. I was in Cornwall last week and stuck on the A39 for a long time with a car full behind a car and caravan doing 40 down a national (Grrr).

When it came to overtake, I had to check revs (not enough, only 1300), work out where the gear lower sits at that speed (at 1700), so changed down, had revs, mirror, signal, hit the pedal, turbo and torque at peak, made progress, near hitting top of the powerband, had to think about revs in top at 60mph (2000), so changed up and got more out, mirror, signal, pulled it, checked speed at 70, eased off. Phew!

Overtaking complete.


With a petrol, it's much easier. They have much wider power band making this an easier affair.

As for riding on the clutch, you can do that with most large engined petrol, in fact with the choke out on my 3500S and impressive 15mph is possible in second without any throttle at all.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Hawesy1982

After driving my mum's petrol fiesta for three years before recently getting my own car, a 1995 306 DTurbo, i can definitely say that IMO diesels are certainly no harder to drive, as in my daily queueing to work i no longer spend the whole time changing between 1st and 3rd, and on the motorways rush hour joining is made much easier by the punch of the turbo helping to pick out a space. Plus the TD is SOOOO much more fun to drive when you get nice open roads to play on!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Tony N
I think 3500 has hit the nail on the head there. Overtaking in my Focus TDCi was always a hairy business. Not so in the Civic though, 2nd gear, into the VTEC and your gone!

As for holding high gears, my SD1 would happily climb up Holliwell Hill in St. Albans in 5th at well under 1000 rpm!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - AndyT
My Clio dci is not so nice in stop-go traffic as her indoors Ka.

For sure, the Clio won't stall on idle but it tends to "launch" forward slightly as the electronic injection compensates for the revs trying to drop, then after the inital launch the engine then brakes sending you forward in your seat a bit. Slightly exaggerated, but you get the idea. Then if you decide to use the "throttle" at these slow speeds, its a bit like an on-off switch. A little practice with clucth slip and a sensitive right foot helps.

The Ka will stall at a sniff of the clutch without a touch of throttle, but once moving in traffic is wonderfully flexible as regards picking up smoothly from low revs in 2nd gear etc.

Of course, out on the open road the Clio is the better car as regards overtaking/hillclimbing etc.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - J Bonington Jagworth
" First was only used from standing start. To compensate, they had a low second."

Eh? You only need synchro to change into a gear, and there are very few occasions when one actually needed to change into first on the move. That's still the case, in my experience, so why first gear for car parks? As it happens, I can change into reverse on the move, although I don't use that much, either!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - mlj
3500s;
I re-read your overtaking account and simply did not understand it.You were travelling at 40 mph but only turning 1300rpm. You had to change down and then back up during the overtaking manoeuvre because you had reached the rev limit. Sorry, but at 1300rpm you must have been in 6th gear. Once you are in the powerband a car and caravan would be passed in a few seconds well before reaching the rev limit. I recently moved back to petrol from diesel and the worst aspect of the new motor is the need to move into 3rd or even 2nd to overtake. I know there are wondercars which have huge amounts of power but for easy overtaking give me a turbodiesel any time.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
"I re-read your overtaking account and simply did not understand it."

Oh, I understand it - it's again with the being in 6th gear at 40mph nonsense.
4th gear at 40 and Hey Presto "problems" disappear.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
JBJ - "why first gear for car parks?"

Erm, what other gear do you suggest for 4mph?
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - chris2
most cars are "first gear is for pulling away from standing, change up to second as soon as possible"

My Golf manual states not to use first for more than afew yards.

So I suppose the answer is 2nd
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Dynamic Dave
All this talk of gear changing makes me glad I now drive an auto and can let the electronics decide which is the best gear to be in ;o)
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - 3500S
Sorry, to clear up the confusion.

The R75 gearbox for the 131Ps Diesel Turbo.

5th gear, 30mph/1000rpm
4th gear, 22mph/1000rpm
3rd gear, 16mph/1000rpm
2nd gear, 10mph/1000rpm

These are approximations, 5th is the most accurate.

Overtaking a car and caravan at 40mph, car in top. 1300rpm.

The 131PS CDT has a peak torque band of about 1750 - 3250rpm. The turbo really comes in at 2000.

So at 40mph to hit the peak torque, 4th gear, 40mph, 1800rpm

In the band, apply foot on throttle and lift off.

But at 65mph - revs in 4th = 3000rpm almost at the end of peak torque

So in 5th, 65mph is 2100rpm.

It's complicated and it requires a bit more planning that mirror-signal-maneouvre and boot it in a petrol car.

And as an ex auto driver, this was never a problem, any of it, autos are by far the easier way to drive a car.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - 3500S
Incidentally, I was always told and am still always told you should sit in the highest gear possible for driving. The only exception was an ADI who I had as a passenger, they advocated a lower gear sometimes but only in traffic. He called it 'one less thing to worry about'

I agree with the 1st gear mentality, pull away, anything more than 5mph into 2nd.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Rudedog
When I changed from petrol to diesel in my Golf TDI, I found it was easy to stall the car. When approaching a junction/roundabout with a petrol engine you could get close to it before dipping the clutch, but with the diesel leaving it too long meant the engine began to jump and verge on stalling. I assume that this is because of the diesel being a compression engine, I now find the diesel easier to drive (less gear changes) but I had to change my style of driving.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - RichardW
What is really happening is that you are hitting the governor on the engine, and it trys to push you on to keep the engine speed up, whilst you are trying to slow it down (if you try this in 5th, it occurs around 25mph in most diesels!). You'd be pretty unlikely to stall it - you'd give up on the brake pedal first!Early down change, or declutching required to maintain smooth process.


RichardW

Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
"I was always told and am still always told you should sit in the highest gear possible for driving"

Ohmigod! Told by who?

(that being almost the exact opposite of what I teach)
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - RichardW
>Ohmigod! Told by who?

Exactly! Where does the peak torque occur? Usually 2,000 rpm in a diesel engine. Conveniently this also equates to the lowest specific fuel consumption (say kg fuel/kW power produced). So, it's best to try and stick to 2000 rpm as much as possible. Conveniently in my cars this equates to 30 in 3rd, 40 in 4th, and 50 in 5th - makes it easy to stick to speed limits. This also means you are right on the power to accelerate when needs be, and have all the flexibility you need.

I drove a petrol Focus in Holland last week - the first petrol car I have driven for about 30,000 miles - stalled it 3 times before I got it out of the carpark, and then couldn't understand why it wouldn't go up slip roads etc, until I realised I need to be 2 gears lower than in my TD to get it into the power band. Give me the diesl any day!



RichardW

Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
"So, it's best to try and stick to 2000 rpm as much as possible. Conveniently in my cars this equates to 30 in 3rd, 40 in 4th, and 50 in 5th - makes it easy to stick to speed limits.
So, it's best to try and stick to 2000 rpm as much as possible. This also means you are right on the power to accelerate when needs be, and have all the flexibility you need."


Vunderbar! Someone who understands!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - teabelly
Would driving in the peak torque area in a petrol car produce the lowest specific fuel consumption even if ( for the sake of argument) peak torque occurred at 4000 rpm? I would imagine there is more of a balancing act with a petrol car as the peak torque figures are higher up or is that just not the case and the peak torque rule always applies?
teabelly
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
"autos are by far the easier way to drive a car."

Agreed. Also by far the safest for the "old men" who think that revs are terrble and 30 in 5th is somehow "good".
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Hawesy1982

I have recently found that it is near impossible to stall my 306DTurbo, even in traffic jams i can let go of everything and it just keeps on going, the revs drop to around 850rpm but its still fairly smooth. I know there is an anti-stall speed but never really knew what it was for! I assume this?

Also, forgive my ignorance but why is the best fuel consumption at 2000rpm instead of lower, and why is 1000rpm not excellent? Not starting an argument i just dont understand that!

However if its best to hold 2000rpm that does me fine as the cars like a rocket when accelerating from there!

Thanks in advance for explaining this
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Dizzy {P}

Also, forgive my ignorance but why is the best fuel consumption at 2000rpm instead of lower, and why is 1000rpm not excellent?
>>

Lots of things govern fuel consumption but a very important one is that engines are most efficient at the speed which produces maximum torque, and this typically occurs around 2000 rpm in car diesel engines, never at 1000 rpm for instance.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - J Bonington Jagworth
"..what other gear do you suggest for 4mph?"

Well, for the little time I actually spend at 4mph, the clutch serves nicely (and before you ask, the last clutch I replaced was on my Wartburg in 1980). I can do 7-8 mph in second without it, which is slow enough for trundling around a carpack, surely? As it happens, I don't think second gears are any higher now than in days of yore, since we now have at least five ratios and wider powerbands - with petrol, anyway...
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
"I can do 7-8 mph in second . .which is slow enough for trundling around a carpack, surely?"

Nope. Not when the limit is 4mph.

Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - J Bonington Jagworth
"Not when the limit is 4mph."

I can't say I've met one of those, but how would you know you're obeying it? Most speedometers aren't calibrated below 10mph!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Welliesorter
I had the majority of my driving lessons in an old model 1.8 diesel Fiesta but passed my test in the new model 1.4 diesel. The first of these was more or less as described by automaticallyuk: very hard to stall and would happily manouvre without touching the accelerator.

Although almost as easy to drive, the newer model behaved much more like a petrol one: it would stall without at least some use of the accelerator, even at very slow speeds. I don't know whether the newer car was typical of the current model (I believe the engine is shared with Peugeot and some other manufacturers) or just an oddity.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - 3500S
Halleujah.

Thank you, the 2000rpm rule. Should be the first line of any diesel car owner handbook.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
"the 2000rpm rule. Should be the first line of any diesel car owner handbook."

Wonderful. So we all all agreed.

And the second line should be: "And when accelerating it is OK to take it up to 4000rpm."

NOT change up at 3000 rpm (because of the noise?)

and NEVER change up during an overtake.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Tom Shaw
Simple formula for deciding the correct gear to use; It should allow you to use engine braking by lifting off the gas and should be able to accelerate the car briskly when going back on it again. Overgear and you can do neither of those. dangerous habit.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Flat in Fifth
"the 2000rpm rule. Should be the first line of any diesel
car owner handbook."
Wonderful. So we are all agreed.
And the second line should be: "And when accelerating it is
OK to take it up to 4000rpm."
NOT change up at 3000 rpm (because of the noise?)
and NEVER change up during an overtake.


Keep at it Trev! At times I wondered if you were ever going to get the message through about being in the right gear at all times being a fundamental.

BTW what noise @ 3000rpm? not in the TDCi still quiet and pulling stronger than a train.

Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
JBJ - you need a speedo to tell you you are doing walking speed?
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - J Bonington Jagworth
Well, yes, actually - unless there's someone walking nearby to compare it to. As I say, I don't remember encountering a 4mph limit in a car park, but if I did and was accused of breaking it, I think the fact that it was below the operational threshold of my speedometer would be a reasonable defence!
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - KB.
Without wishing to side with anyone on this question of suitable speeds in supermarket car parks, I just visited Safeways and, with this in mind, noted what speed would be (in my opinion) safe and appropriate. It seemed to me that 4mph (which is equivalent to moderate walking pace) in first gear, could easily be deemed irrationally slow. I tried speeds up to 10 mph (as displayed on my Yaris digital display) in second and found that this was not excessive bearing in mind the hazards which could be expected. Anything above this could well be deemed too much, but at 9pm in a large, almost empty car park, even this is debatable.
KB.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - TrevP
Ah, so the LARGE signs for 5mph in my local Tesco's are "irrationally slow"?.

Could this be similar thinking to saying 30mph signs are sometimes "irrationally slow"?
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Dynamic Dave
Ok, enough. I think the point has been made.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - jud
Thank you for a very entertaining thread. I must say there are some very strange people out there.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - J Bonington Jagworth
Well, I was going to draw attention to Trevor's surname, but perhaps I'd better not... :-)
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Marcos{P}
My local Tesco signs all say 10mph. If you drove around our local one at 5mph it would take all day.
Im sure some people think motorway speed limits apply though.
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - Altea Ego
My loal tesco car park is like the chariot scene in Ben Hur
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - NorthernKev {P}
My Tesco don't have a speed limit [or I haven't noticed it...]. Due to it being private ground does this mean there isn't one? Or the speed the last sign said [30??]

I started learning to drive in a diesel Saxo, truely truely awful car. He bought a petrol Fiesta; beautiful drive. Sure I stalled it, but worth it for pure driving pleasure. I loved learning to drive!

Kev
Diesel Cars - Easier to drive v petrol - OptimaBen (formerly SeeFive)
You need to acquire a certain style to driving a diesel saxo, give it time and you will love it.

Ben
On my 3rd Citroen. Saxo, Xsara, C5.

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